The Amygdala and the Stethoscope: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine – A Lecture by Danielle Ofri

The Amygdala and the Stethoscope: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine – A Lecture by Danielle Ofri

Vision & Voices – The Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Series

Date: Monday, September 22, 2014
Location: Mayer Auditorium, USC Health Sciences Campus
Time: 11:30-12:30 PM
RSVP: 
http://bit.ly/1orEqx1

As part of the Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Series, which engages core health issues in society today, we will present an afternoon with essayist and physician Danielle Ofri. Renowned for her use of dramatic stories, Ofri will explore how emotions permeate clinical decisions and provoke physicians, despite their commitment to the scientific method, to act in ways that are not nearly as rational and evidence-based as they may think.

Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, an associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine, has her clinical home at Bellevue Hospital, the oldest public hospital in the country. She writes about medicine and the patient-physician relationship for the New York Times and is the founder and editor in chief of the Bellevue Literary Review, the first literary journal to arise from a medical setting. Ofri is the recipient of the John P. McGovern Award from the American Medical Writers Association for “preeminent contributions to medical communication.”

Organized by Pamela Schaff (Pediatrics and Family Medicine), Lyn Boyd-Judson (Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics), and Alexander Capron (Law and Medicine).

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics, Keck School of Medicine’s Program in Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics, and the USC Pacific Center for Health Policy and Ethics.

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