The Future of the GOP: Should/Can the Party Reinvent Itself?

The Department of Political Sciences Presents:
Political Conversations
The Future of the GOP: Should/Can the Party Reinvent Itself?

Join Prof. Bob Shrum at our very first Political Conversations as he sits down with Alex Castellanos, member of CNN’s “Best Political Team on Television” and co-founder of Purple Strategies, a bi-partisan public affairs firm. Castellanos has been a strategist and advisor for Jeb Bush, Mitt Romney’s 2008 presidential campaign, and a host of other Republican leaders.

When: Monday, September 15, 2014
Time: 2 – 3:00pm
Where: VKC, Room 300A (3rd Floor)
More on Political Conversations: dornsife.usc.edu/politicalscience/political-conversations

Spirit of the Law Series featuring Hon. Bernard J. Kamins, Judge, Los Angeles Superior Court (Ret)

Spirit of the Law Series featuring Hon. Bernard J. Kamins, Judge, Los Angeles Superior Court (Ret)

Date: Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Location: Gould School of Law (LAW), Room 2
Time: 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM | Lunch Served
RSVP: bit.ly/1sg5eGE

Spirit of the Law features legal professionals discussing how they find meaning, purpose, and identity in the law.

Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins served 22 years on the bench and served as a public defender prior to being appointed a judge. After graduating from USC Law School in 1968, Kamins became a Deputy Public Defender and served as deputy in charge for the LA Juvenile Hall Court. He then was appointed to the Los Angeles Municipal Court by George Deukmejian in 1985 and was appointed to the Los Angeles Superior Court the following year. Kamins spent all but one year of his judicial career presiding over criminal cases and briefly presided over the widely publicized Rodney King beating case in 1991. From 2000 to 2007, Kamins ran Drug Court for the entire western portion of LA County. Though formally retired, Kamins currently serves as a judge at the Van Nuys Courthouse in the assigned judge program and is working on creating a prostitution diversion program for the local court. Kamins holds a B.A. in Sociology from UC Santa Barbara and a J.D. from the University of Southern California. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Law at Pepperdine University’s law school.

Co-Sponsored by the Office of Religious Life and the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics

Virtues and Vices Series: What is courage?

Virtues and Vices Series: What is courage?

Date: Monday, September 29, 2014
Location: THH 201
Time: 5:00 – 6:00 PM 

Co-sponsored by the Thematic Option Honors Program, the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics, and the Levan Institute Fellows

Join us for a wide-ranging discussion that tries to get at the virtue of courage. Why might it be important for us to determine the limits of courage? When is an act courageous; when might the same act instead be cowardly or reckless? Can someone act with courage without understanding what courage is? What is the relationship between the virtue of courage and other virtues like wisdom, justice, and reverence? How might we best be courageous in our daily lives? All who are interested in participating are welcome. The discussion will be guided by students from Thematic Option and Levan Institute Fellows and will be moderated by James Collins, Assistant Professor of Classics.

The Amygdala and the Stethoscope: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine – A Lecture by Danielle Ofri

The Amygdala and the Stethoscope: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine – A Lecture by Danielle Ofri

Vision & Voices – The Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Series

Date: Monday, September 22, 2014
Location: Mayer Auditorium, USC Health Sciences Campus
Time: 11:30-12:30 PM
RSVP: 
http://bit.ly/1orEqx1

As part of the Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Series, which engages core health issues in society today, we will present an afternoon with essayist and physician Danielle Ofri. Renowned for her use of dramatic stories, Ofri will explore how emotions permeate clinical decisions and provoke physicians, despite their commitment to the scientific method, to act in ways that are not nearly as rational and evidence-based as they may think.

Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, an associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine, has her clinical home at Bellevue Hospital, the oldest public hospital in the country. She writes about medicine and the patient-physician relationship for the New York Times and is the founder and editor in chief of the Bellevue Literary Review, the first literary journal to arise from a medical setting. Ofri is the recipient of the John P. McGovern Award from the American Medical Writers Association for “preeminent contributions to medical communication.”

Organized by Pamela Schaff (Pediatrics and Family Medicine), Lyn Boyd-Judson (Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics), and Alexander Capron (Law and Medicine).

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics, Keck School of Medicine’s Program in Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics, and the USC Pacific Center for Health Policy and Ethics.

Muslims in Public Service – Friday Sept. 5 (Organized by Prof. Sherman Jackson)

A full-day conference featuring Muslims in various aspects and levels of government discussing their experiences, challenges, advice and vision for the future. Keynote address to be delivered by Congressman Keith Ellison (D-Minn.).

Since 9/11, the place of Islam and Muslims in American society has become a major national preoccupation. From no-fly lists to secret surveillance of mosques to legislative campaigns against shari’a law, Muslims have frequently come under suspicion regarding their socio-political roles and aspirations in the United States. Some have even questioned whether Muslims are entitled to constitutional protections that are recognized as the birthright of all other Americans, arguing that “Islam is different.”

Yet lost in all of this controversy is the fact that Muslims continue to function as public servants at virtually every level of American government, from elected officials to advisors and political appointees, from congresspersons to judges to Homeland Security personnel. “American Muslims in Public Service,” a one-day conference that will be held on 5 September 2014 at the University of Southern California’s Tudor Conference Center, will bring together a broad cross-section of American Muslims in public service to share their experiences, perspectives, fears, hopes, advice and prognostications. The conference will be inter-active, inviting questions and perspectives from the audience, along with responses from the participants. It will be capped by a special keynote address that evening by Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minnesota).

Click here to RSVP

PROGRAM
DATE: Friday, September 5, 2014
TIME: 8:00 AM – 7:30 PM
LOCATION: Panels – USC Tudor Campus Center; Keynote – USC Bovard Auditorium

Continental breakfast provided
Reception to follow keynote

MORNING
PANEL 1: Advisors, Aides, and Hopefuls

  • Suhail A. Khan, Conservative Activist and former Bush Appointee
  • Rahmat Khan, Candidate, Torrance (CA) City Council
  • Ilhaam Jaffer, White House Advance Associate
  • Asim Ghafoor, Former Legislative Assistant
PANEL 2: Law Enforcement and the Courts
  • Sylvester Johnson, Police Commissioner, Philadelphia
  • Mona Youssef, Jurist, Third Judicial Circuit of Michigan-Juvenile Division
  • Hassan A. El-Amin, Associate Judge for the Seventh Judicial Circuit of Maryland
AFTERNOON 
PANEL 3: Muslims in Public Service in Los Angeles and California:
  • Halim Dhanidina, Judge, Los Angeles County Superior Court
  • Farrah N. Khan, Community Services Commissioner, City of Irvine
  • Belal Dalati, Commissioner, City of Anaheim
  • Haroon Azar, Department of Homeland Security Regional Director for Strategic Engagement

PANEL 4: Federal, State and International

  • Saud Anwar, Mayor of South Windsor, Connecticut
  • Larry Shaw, Senator, North Carolina
  • Shaarik Zafar, Special Representative to Muslim Communities, U.S. Department of State
KEYNOTE: Congressman Keith Ellison
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Congressman Keith Ellison represents Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Fifth District includes the City of Minneapolis and surrounding suburbs and is one of the most vibrant and ethnically diverse districts in Minnesota. Rep. Ellison’s guiding philosophy is based on “generosity and inclusion,” and his priorities in Congress are building prosperity for working families, promoting peace, pursuing environmental sustainability and advancing civil and human rights. As a member of the House Financial Services Committee, the congressman helps oversee the nation’s financial services and housing industries, as well as Wall Street. In response to the foreclosure crisis that began in 2008, Rep. Ellison wrote the Protecting Tenants in Foreclosure Act, which requires banks and other new owners to provide at least 90 days’ notice of eviction to renters occupying foreclosed homes.

For the 113th Congress, Rep. Ellison was elected co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, which promotes the progressive promise of fairness for all. He is also a member of the Congressional Black Caucus, founded the Congressional Consumer Justice Caucus and belongs to more than a dozen other caucuses that focus on issues ranging from social inclusion to environmental protection. Before being elected to Congress, Rep. Ellison was a noted community activist and ran a thriving civil rights, employment and criminal defense law practice in Minneapolis. Born and raised in Detroit, he has lived in Minnesota since earning his law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1990. He is the proud father of four children.

Co-Sponsored by:
  • USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture
  • USC Office of Religious Life
  • USC School of Religion
  • USC Center for Law, History and Culture
  • USC Department of American Studies and Ethnicity
  • USC Muslim Student Union

American Muslims in Public Service

Theatre in America – fun 2 unit elective for Fall 2014

THEATRE IN AMERICA: THTR 295 – FALL 2014

Gain an understanding of how live theatre is created and relates to its audience. Attend award winning productions:

WE WILL ROCK YOU

JERSEY BOYS

HEARTBEAT OF HOME

KINKY BOOTS

WHAT THE BUTLER SAW

PIPPIN

COURSE: THTR 295 -62840R (2.0 units)

MEETING DATES/TIME: 2:00 p.m., Mondays

And productions on Fridays at 8:00 p.m.

LOCATION: KAP 165

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Frank Catalano served as an executive at Warner Bros, Lorimar Studios and Beverly Hills Playhouse. He has written and performed in animated, live action television series and feature films including, The Adventures of Dynamo Duck for Fox Television, Digimon Digital Monsters, Super Pig, Bit The Cupid, Bee Bop Cowboy, the Sci–‐Fi series Robotech, Flint the Time Detective, Vampire Princess Miyu, Honey Bee Hutch and ABC television series including LA Law, NYPD Blue and Ugly Betty. He currently is the president of The Creative Edge providing consultancy, coaching and speaking services for actors, writers and producing organizations. His published books include Art of the Monologue, The Creative Audience, White Knight Black Night, Autumn Sweet, The Resting Place, Rand Unwrapped –‐ Confessions of a Robotech Warrior, Che Che and Short Monologues for Auditions.

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New 3+3 Program at USC LAW

WANT TO START LAW SCHOOL EARLY? 

Come and hear about USC Gould’s Newest Law Program, the 3+3!

WHEN: Tuesday, April 29

TIME:  12:00 – 1:00 pm

LOCATION:  Musick Law Building, Room 7

The USC Gould School of Law is pleased to announce the 3+3 – BA to JD Program for outstanding  top USC undergraduates who have demonstrated high academic achievement during their first 3 years of undergraduate studies and are interested in beginning their law school program early.  The program provides for completion of both undergraduate degree and J.D. in six years instead of the usual seven.  Students will begin Law School in their fourth year taking a normal first-year law course load.

The program is open to undergraduates who have completed their required curriculum and have a minimum GPA of 3.8.  The Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) is not required.  Other law school application materials are necessary including, application, all transcripts,  SAT-Reading score, personal statement, letters of recommendation, and a personal interview.

Applications will be accepted beginning September 1, 2014 for entrance in the fall of 2015 law class.

Can’t make the meeting?  Contact USC Gould Admissions Office at (213) 740-2523.