Spring Break Aquaponics workshop for USC students

The Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies, in partnership with EVO Farm and the USC Office of Sustainability, is proud to announce a 3-day Spring Break AQUAPONICS WORKSHOP for USC students.

What you’ll gain:

  • Lasting impact in the community! Workshop participants will build aquaponics systems that will be donated to:
    • Community Services Unlimited- a grassroots non-profit that sets up urban farms in South LA to provide residents with fresh organic produce
    • The USC Urban Garden- part of the USC Sustainability Network
    • Knowledge and resources to help you build your own aquaponics system at home
    • Networking opportunities with LA environmental organizations and community
    • Eligibility to apply for future paid internships to build aquaponics systems with the Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies, at Catalina Island and/or local K-12 schools

Included: Breakfast and lunch every day, materials and tools, transportation for afternoon field trip to other aquaponics systems around the city.

Optional: pre-workshop day trip to the Wrigley Marine Science Center on Catalina Island (March 17)

Program cost: $75 (Non-refundable)

Space is limited to the first 15 students who register. REGISTER TODAY!

VIRTUES AND VICES SERIES: What is Justice?

WhatisJustice_020215

VIRTUES AND VICES SERIES: What is Justice?

February 2, 2015, 5-6:30 PM | THH 212 | Pizza Served
Website: http://dornsife.usc.edu/virtues-and-vices
RSVP:  http://bit.ly/1ua3eDx

Co-sponsored by the USC Levan Institute Undergraduate Fellows and the Thematic Option Honors Program

Following the workshop on courage, we will now move to the virtue of justice. Aristotle noted that, among the canonical virtues, justice is a special case primarily because people mean so many different things when they appeal to it. Sometimes what is lawful is just, while at other times justice may require unlawful action. Sometimes justice can be equated with fairness, and yet at other times justice may require actions that seem inequitable. According to Aristotle, justice is also difficult to determine because, of the two parties which it involves, one often has a higher status than the other. We will navigate this difficult terrain with special focus, as ever, on how we might best be just in our daily lives.

The discussion will be guided by Levan Institute Fellows and students from Thematic Option and will be moderated by James Collins, Assistant Professor of Classics.

The Virtues and Vices Series encourages student discussion about virtues, vices, and their role in everyday life.

Center for Excellence in Teaching Summer Opportunities

In today’s competitive job market, employers consider far more than academic performance when evaluating the strength of an applicant; how an individual spends his or her summer is often a distinguishing factor in hiring decisions. Each year, USC offers students a multitude of programs including internships, summer courses, overseas travel, research stipends, and volunteering to help you grow as a student and make your resume stand out. Join the Center for Excellence in Teaching’s Undergraduate Fellows on Thursday, January 29th at 4 PM in GFS 207 as we discuss the resources available to students and share strategies to plan your ideal summer. Pizza and Drinks will be served on a first come, first serve basis.

ZYGO Series – QUARANTINE: Balancing Human Rights with Medical Best Interests

ZYGO Series—QUARANTINE: Balancing Human Rights with Medical Best Interests
Friday, January 23, 2014, Doheny Memorial Library 241 | 12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch Provided
RSVP:  http://bit.ly/1Cf8IxO
More Information: http://dornsife.usc.edu/zygo-series

The first known usage of quarantine dates back from 1377 in the city of Dubrovnik, Croatia when ships suspected of carrying the Black Plague were subjected to a 40 day hold before being allowed to enter the port. Quarantine is distinct from isolation in that it is solely a preventive measure enacted to seclude individuals who may be at risk of spreading a certain disease.

Although quarantine has not been frequently implemented in recent history, during the recent outbreak of Ebola, entire villages in Liberia were subjected to quarantines, and in the US, multiple states implemented mandatory quarantines for health care workers returning from West Africa. These quarantine policies were heavily criticized by many as violating basic human rights and simply being unnecessary. Panelists for this forum will consider the medical relevance and necessity of quarantine and the human rights concerns associated with it.

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Panelists:
Sofia Gruskin, J.D., MIA, Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine and Gould School of Law, and Director, Program on Global Health & Human Rights, Keck School of Medicine
Alison Dundes Renteln, Professor of Political Science, Anthropology, and Policy, Planning, and Development, USC Dornsife
Paul Holtom, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Orthopedics and Program Director, Infectious Disease Fellowship Program, Keck School of Medicine
Abelard Podgorski, Ph.D. Student, Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Jacob Roberts, Undergraduate Student, Economics and East Asian Languages and Cultures, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

USC Religion’s lunchtime intellectual community event!

FEED YOUR MIND! FEED YOUR BODY!

Casual. Food. Conversation. Controversy. Come.

PIZZA and refreshments. LOTS of pizza.

USC Religion’s lunchtime intellectual community event!!
Wednesday, January 21, 2015
***12:20 – 12:55 pm***

USC Ahmanson Center room ACB 238 (west tower, 2nd floor)
USC Professor Bruce Zuckerman

Who Messed up the Bible and How Can We Fix It?

All students, staff, faculty are welcome.

Lunch & Learn: Taproot Foundation 1/27

Free lunch! Amazing, inspiring speakers! What could be better? The USC Brittingham Social Enterprise Lab invites you to our first Lunch & Learn event of the spring semester, featuring Joel Bashevkin, Executive Director of Taproot, Bay Area, Director of Global Pro Bono, and current interim Executive Director the Taproot Foundation, Los Angeles.

Founded in 2001, the Taproot Foundation’s mission is to “lead, mobilize and engage professionals in pro bono service that drives social change.” Its work focuses around building a pro bono marketplace that, like philanthropy, is large, transparent, professional and accessible.

Taproot’s Los Angeles office has worked with over 1,000 local nonprofit organizations, delivering close to 350 Service Grant projects, constituting over 150,000 hours of pro bono service. In just over six years, we have readied more than 2,000 Los Angeles professionals to take on pro bono challenges.

Joel Bashevkin has been the Executive Director of Taproot Foundation, Bay Area for six years. With a focus on building a strong pro bono marketplace in the region, he leads the effort to engage business professionals, nonprofits and corporations in high quality, impactful pro bono engagements. Focused on consulting to organizations undergoing tremendous growth and organizational development, Joel’s nearly 30 year nonprofit career includes the roles of JCC Executive Director, Contemporary Jewish Museum Deputy Director & Boston Food Bank Operations Director. He has also served on nonprofit boards and has consulted to organizations working in the areas of arts, disability, public health, domestic poverty and hunger.

Complementary lunch is served.

RSVP requested at http://bit.ly/1xlUuop

Co-sponsored by the Trojan Consulting Group and Los Angeles Community Impact

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The Brittingham Social Enterprise Lab provides opportunities for USC students, faculty, and other individuals to use business principles to create positive social and environmental impact. Through education, programs, events, and career development, we inspire the next generation of enlightened business leaders and social entrepreneurs.

The Lunch & Learn series exposes the USC community to issues of social and environmental importance and how business solutions can be used to approach these issues. They are open to all students and faculty. (http://bit.ly/1oAc1WS)

Visit our website: http://www.marshall.usc.edu/bsel
Sign up for our mailing list: http://bit.ly/14xfO37

Problems without Passports in Dakar, Senegal

Dakar, Senegal awaits! Culture, cuisine, history, nightlife, and beaches…experience all of these while learning about and researching Senegal’s rich literary traditions and contemporary literati.

This Problems without Passports class, French 499, invites any and all students with a good knowledge of French (intermediate recommended) to apply for this unique course. After one week at USC, we will travel to Dakar, Senegal to spend three weeks with writers, publishers, artists, Senegalese university students, and the like. USC students in anthropology, comparative literature, history, global studies, IR, narrative studies, global health, ASE, sociology, and of course, French, would all gain from this opportunity. For example, if you’re interested in history, your research could focus on writers whose works rewrite and reimagine postcolonial history. Global health? Choose a novel that treats disability and/or disease in Senegal.

INFO SESSION to be held Tuesday, January 27, 3 – 4:30pm in Taper 120.

Refreshments served!