Maymester 2015 – Religion in Los Angeles

Enroll in REL 468 Sociology of Religion
Section Number : 60123

Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 1 – 5:10 pm
May 20 – June 16

Meeting in ABM, Suite 200
509 W. 29th St. Los Angeles
(Down the street from USC)

Los Angeles is a world-class laboratory for the study of religion. This Maymester course will enable a small group of students to have a hands-on experience studying religion under the mentorship of Professor Donald Miller, Director of USC’s Center for Religion and Civic culture.

Students will investigate the diversity of religious groups in three different neighborhoods in Los Angeles. The class will participate in field trips to study Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, and Hindu congregations – as well as various new religious movements that focus on meditation.

Summer employment option after the course’s conclusion. Students will be invited to apply for summer employment at the Center for Religion and Civic Culture, continuing research on religion in Southern California. Stipends for summer research will be $2500.

For more information, contact the School of Religion at (213) 740-0272 or wootton@usc.edu

Info Session for Maymester SWMS 499, Food Culture and Food Politics in the Land of Plenty

Information Session: Maymester 2015
SWMS 499, Food Culture and Food Politics in the Land of Plenty
January 22, 2015
1 – 2:30 pm, THH 420
Phone: 213-740-8286
RSVP: gender@usc.edu

Learn about Gender Studies Maymester SWMS 499, a course in which students will explore the dynamic relationships between food, politics, and gender in Los Angeles and the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Professor Karen Tongson will review the budget, syllabus, and travel plans. Refreshments served.

Course Offering: AHIS 325 4 Units): “Roman Archaeological Excavation: Methods & Practice”

USC Summer Archaeological Excavation at Ostia Antica, the Port of Ancient Rome (June 8 to July 19, 2015)
AHIS 325 (4 Units): “Roman Arachaeological Excavation: Methods & Practice”

6 week program: 1 week of walking tours of Rome & Ostia, 5 weeks of excavating at Ostia

(Students housed in apartments in the center of Rome)

No prerequisites or previous archaeological experience necessary: All instruction in English

For a report on the excavation, see USC Daily Trojan Online: http://dailytrojan.com/2014/08/28/professor-leads-archaeology-expedition/

For those interested in participating, please email Dr. John Pollini, Professor of Classical Art, Archaeology, & History
Department of Art History, USC : pollini@usc.edu
Deadline for Housing Deposit: On or before Sun., March 1, 2015

Problems without Passports in Dakar, Senegal

Dakar, Senegal awaits! Culture, cuisine, history, nightlife, and beaches…experience all of these while learning about and researching Senegal’s rich literary traditions and contemporary literati.

This Problems without Passports class, French 499, invites any and all students with a good knowledge of French (intermediate recommended) to apply for this unique course. After one week at USC, we will travel to Dakar, Senegal to spend three weeks with writers, publishers, artists, Senegalese university students, and the like. USC students in anthropology, comparative literature, history, global studies, IR, narrative studies, global health, ASE, sociology, and of course, French, would all gain from this opportunity. For example, if you’re interested in history, your research could focus on writers whose works rewrite and reimagine postcolonial history. Global health? Choose a novel that treats disability and/or disease in Senegal.

INFO SESSION to be held Tuesday, January 27, 3 – 4:30pm in Taper 120.

Refreshments served!


Summer 2015 Problems without Passports course

Indigenous Language Revitalization: FREN 499

No previous foreign language experience needed, course is taught in English. French components are required for French minors and majors.

The Department of French and Italian are offering a 4-unit Problems without Passports course. The course lasts 5 weeks (July 7-August 11) starting with a 2-week field experience in Louisiana with New Orleans as the home base.

For more information, please visit the PwP website http://dornsife.usc.edu/fren-499-ilr/ or e-mail Jessica Kanoski at jkanoski@usc.edu

AMST 348m: Race and the Environment

Spring 2015 Semester
Section: 10346R
Type: Lecture
Time: 9:30-10:50 am
Date: Tue, Thu
Instructor: Laura Pulido
Location: VHE 217
Units: 4

In this course we will examine the nature of environmental problems and the environmental movement from a racial and social justice perspective. We will explore how environmental hazards often disproportionately impact vulnerable communities and how they have mobilized to resist such problems. Topics to be covered include: the origins of the environmental movement, the environmental justice movement, air toxins, pesticides, and climate justice. Course will involve a hands-on research project.

This course satisfies the university’s diversity requirement.

SOCI 499: The Evolution of Musical Hierarchies in American Society

Music is classified across Western societies as “classical” (or “highbrow”) and “popular.” The notion of cultural hierarchy implicit in these labels is so pervasive that musical genres can appear to belong inherently to one category or the other. Opera, the symphony, and chamber music are today typically thought of as “classical,” whereas the Broadway musical, jazz, country, and rock are “popular.” But what may seem to be immutable categorizations have in fact varied across time in response to each era’s particular social, aesthetic, and ideological concerns. This course examines continuity and change in American society’s conception of cultural hierarchy in music. It engages enduring questions about music’s social origins and functions and scrutinizes the evolving relationships between cultural stratification and social class.