Religion Courses Fall 2014

REL 331: Religions of East Asia
What is religious about traditional Chinese medicine? Is the Japanese emperor divine? What does Shamanism have to do with student protest in Korea? This course tries to answer some of these questions. Students will be introduced to the basic worldviews, teachings, texts, and practices in the religions of China, Japan, and Korea.

REL 339: Studies in the History of Christianity
Martyrs. Theological Controversy. Heresy. Miracles. The second century had it all. The various Christianities of the second century were shaped by heated debates over everything to do with theology, ethics, and identity. Out of the second century come some of Christianity’s most familiar concepts and some of its most interesting lost possibilities. It was a time of new possibilities, experimentation, and debate around issues not all that dissimilar from those that find there way into our own political and theological debates. Christians in the second century debated piety, education, identity, ethnicity, politics, and even the interpretation of art and architecture. Come explore this fascinating and vibrant period of Christianity’s history. In this course we will read together the surviving texts of the second century and explore the complex engagements between Christians, Jews, Greeks, and the broader Roman Empire. No prerequisites required. All are welcome.

REL 364: Religion and Ethics
What counts as a good human life? What does it mean to be a human being? What is the difference between seeking justice and seeking righteousness before God? Our class will explore these fundamental questions by investigating some of the most fascinating authors in western religious thought. No prerequisites required. 

REL 462: Religion and Violence
How is it, we may ask, that religion, one of the most noble activities of the human race, has so often for hundreds of years – and still today – led people to commit horrendous acts? This course explores the timely issue of whether major world religions, especially Christianity, Judaism and Islam, actually lead people to commit acts of violence. Texts, videos, and scholars from different religions help the class explore in depth this complex and widely misunderstood phenomena.

Fall 2014 Archaeology courses

Fall 2014 Interdisciplinary Archaeology courses.

The minor requires only five courses, one of which may count towards GE.  See below for minor requirements and course descriptions.

ONE LOWER DIVISION COURSE FROM:

  • AHIS-120g “Foundations of Western Art” Malone, TTh 12:30-1:50pm
  • AHIS-125g “Arts of Asia: Antiquity to 1300″ Sonya, MW 12:00-1:50pm
  • AHIS-128g “Arts of Latin America” Bleichmar, MW 12:00-1:50pm
  • ANTH-200Lg “The Origins of Humanity” MW 2:00-3:20pm
  • ANTH/CLAS-202 “Archaeology: Our Human Past” Garrison, TTh 9:30-10:50am
  • CHEM 105bL “General Chemistry” Bertolini, MWF 11:00-11:50am
  • ENST-100 “Introduction to Environmental Studies” TTh 9:30-10:50am or 2:00-3:20pm
  • MASC-110L “Materials Science” MWF 11:00-11:50am
  • REL-111g “The World of the Hebrew Bible” Zuckerman, MW 2:00-3:20pm
  • REL-112g “Religions of Egypt and the Ancient Near East” Dodd, TTh 11:00-12:20pm or Th 2:00-2:50pm
  • REL-137g “Introduction to Islam” Jackson, TTh 11:00-12:20pm
  • SSCI-265Lg “The Water Planet” Wilson, TTh 11:00-12:20pm

Upper-division Requirements (16 units)

All students shall be required to take at least one Archaeological Theories and Methods course. Beyond this, students may elect to take either:

A: one additional upper-division course from the Theories and Methods list and two upper-division courses from the Interdisciplinary Perspectives list, or

B: one upper-division course from the Interdisciplinary Perspectives list and two upper-division courses from the Interdisciplinary Applications list.

THEORIES AND METHODS COURSES:

  • AHIS/CLAS-415 “Object-Worlds: Histories and Theories of Things” Yasin, T 2:00-4:50pm

INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES COURSES:

  • AHIS/CLAS-321 “Greek Art and Archaeology” Yasin, TTh 11:00-12:30pm
  • ANTH-300 “Evolution, Ecology, and Culture” Boehm, T 2:00-4:50pm
  • ANTH-310 “Archaeology of the Americas” Garrison, TTh 11:00-12:20pm
  • ANTH-314g “The Nature of Maya Civilization” Garrison, TTh 12:30-1:50pm
  • CLAS-349g “Ancient Empires” TBA
  • JS-378 “Jewish Magic in the Ancient World” Garroway, Hochman, TTh 11:00-12:20pm

INTERDISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS COURSES:

  • CHEM 300L “Analytical Chemistry” Devlin, MWF 10:00-10:50am
  • ENST-320a “Water and Soil Sustainability: Energy and Air Sustainability” MW 2:00-3:20pm or TTh 11:00-12:20pm
  • ENST-320b “Water and Soil Sustainability: Energy and Air Sustainability” MW 2:00-3:20pm
  • GEOL-412 “Oceans, Climate, and the Environment” Feakins, TTh 2:00-3:20pm
  • SSCI-301L “Maps and Spatial Reasoning” Ruddell, MW 2:00-3:20pm

Please feel free to contact Lynn Dodd, Director of the Interdisciplinary Archaeology Major/Minor, at310-210-4081orswartz@usc.eduif you have any questions.

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Maymester course, REL 134: Introduction to Buddhist Literature: Ancient Scriptures and Contemporary Buddhist Life

Maymester course, REL 134: Introduction to Buddhist Literature: Ancient Scriptures and Contemporary Buddhist Life (in Los Angeles)

Study Buddhist life in Los Angeles as part of this new Maymester course, based on Professor Meeks’ popular GE, REL 134! This course is two-pronged. Part of the week will be devoted to lecture and discussion sections. In these meetings you will learn about the history of Buddhist literature and will perform close readings of the tradition’s most fundamental texts. During the remainder of the week, we will embark on fieldtrips to Buddhist temples and will interact with local Buddhist nuns, monks, ministers, and lay followers. On these trips you will discover how contemporary Buddhist communities understand, use, and interpret ancient scriptures as they engage with twenty-first-century American society.

This course will count for GE Category II credit and can also count towards major and minor credit in REL and EAAS. Feel free to contact Prof. Meeks if you have any questions: meeks@usc.edu. To register for the course, go to REL 134xg, listed under "Religion" in the Dornsife Spring 2014 calendar: http://classes.usc.edu/term-20141/classes/rel . For more information on the course, and on Maymesters, see: http://dornsife.usc.edu/rel-134-buddhist-literature/

Maymester course: REL 134g- Introduction to Buddhist Literature

A Maymester version of the GE course, Introduction to Buddhist Literature, this spring, is being offered May 21-June 19, 2014. This course will feature a series of field trips to Buddhist sites throughout the greater Los Angeles area. To register, choose "REL 134: Introduction to Buddhist Literature" (here: http://web-app.usc.edu/soc/20141/rel). We can enroll up to 50 students in the course. There is no formal application process, but if you have any questions, please contact Dr. Lori Meeks, meeks@usc.edu.

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Study Jainism in India – Summer 2014

The International Summer School for Jain Studies (ISSJS) invites you to study in India this summer. ISSJS is offering three programs that vary in length, content, and intensity, each designed for individuals in different stages of study.

Please click on the above links for program details, costs, and deadlines.

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Christmas Eve Mass

Join us at 10pm on December 24th at the USC Caruso Catholic Center for a Christmas mass. Celebrate Christmas with your USC community, family and friends! For more information contact events@catholictrojan.org.

Jewish Studies Spring Classes

Need a Spring Class? The Jewish Studies department has some great classes to check out.

For more information check out our new website: http://dornsife.usc.edu/jewishstudies. Major in Judaic Studies or Minor in Judaic Studies or Jewish American Studies today!

See the below flyers for more details.