Job Announcement: Joint Education Project (JEP) – YSP Teaching Assistant

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT
Joint Educational Project (JEP)– YOUNG SCIENTISTS PROGRAM
USC ReadersPlus
YSP Teaching Assistant

JEP is searching for two undergraduate students pursuing degrees in the sciences with at least one year to commit to the Young Scientists Program (YSP). The YSP Teaching Assistants will be placed at five elementary schools in our immediate USC community to teach hands-on science lessons that will support teachers and students in science education.

This position requires:

  • An interest in science education;
  • Strong communication skills;
  • Strong organization skills;
  • Ability to manage multiple tasks and responsibilities;
  • A self-starter, able to take initiative and work independently;
  • 5 hours per week available to dedicate to the position (pay rate $10/hour);
  • Attendance at regular staff meetings.

Job responsibilities include:

  • Presenting meaningful, hands-on science lessons that will be implemented in the at assigned school;
  • Organizing and maintaining the Science Lab Materials at the school;
  • Assisting classroom teachers and students with science activities to promote the development of science education;
  • Other responsibilities which match specific program needs.

To apply, contact Tina Koneazny:
koneazny@usc.edu
Deadline to apply: Friday, September 5th, 2014

Job Announcement: Joint Educational Project (JEP) – Science Education Teaching Assistant

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT
Joint Educational Project (JEP)– YOUNG SCIENTISTS PROGRAM
USC ReadersPlus

Science Education Teaching Assistant

JEP is searching for two undergraduate students pursuing degrees in the sciences with at least one year to commit to the Young Scientists Program (YSP). The YSP Teaching Assistants will be placed at five elementary schools in our immediate USC community to teach hands-on science lessons that will support teachers and students in science education.

This position requires:

  • An interest in science education;
  • Strong communication skills;
  • Strong organization skills;
  • Ability to manage multiple tasks and responsibilities;
  • A self-starter, able to take initiative and work independently;
  • 5 hours per week available to dedicate to the position (pay rate $10/hour);
  • Attendance at regular staff meetings.

Job responsibilities include:

  • Presenting meaningful, hands-on science lessons that will be implemented in the at assigned school;
  • Organizing and maintaining the Science Lab Materials at the school;
  • Assisting classroom teachers and students with science activities to promote the development of science education;
  • Other responsibilities which match specific program needs.

To apply, contact Tina Koneazny:
koneazny@usc.edu
Deadline to apply: Friday, September 5th, 2014

Research Assistant Position

We are looking for new undergraduate research assistants to aid in research tasks focusing on social and health consequences of drug use.  This is a paid part-time position through the USC School of Social Work and would include assisting with research tasks, such as data entry, literature reviews, and basic data analysis. Those with statistical or qualitative analysis experience are encouraged to apply. Spanish speakers are not required, but preferred.  If interested, please send a completed application and resume to erikague@usc.edu.

Undergraduate Research Opportunity

Interested in gaining valuable experience in a research lab?

Looking for a strong letter of recommendation?

The Town lab is looking for motivated undergraduate students who are interested in gaining lab experience as a research assistant. Our lab focuses on the interface between two main systems of the body, the central nervous system and immune system. More specifically, our lab is interested in the innate immune system in Alzheimer’s disease. There are projects focused on immune drug deliveries in Alzheimer rats, immune reactions to neural stem cell engraftments, and the basic cellular biology of microglia (the resident immune cells of the brain).

Freshmen and sophomores looking for multiple years of experience are highly encouraged to apply. Juniors with lab experience are also encouraged to apply. Animal handling experience is a bonus. Drosophila experience is also a bonus. We are asking students to dedicate at least 15 hours per week.

If you are interested, please send an email with a one paragraph description of your reasons for wanting to join the Town lab along with your CV to Allan Jensen allanjen@usc.edu

New Course Math for 499 (no math prerequisite)

Math 499 The Foundations of Mathematics and the Acquisition of Mathematical Knowledge Spring 2014

Why is addition commutative but its ‘inverse’ subtraction is not? Why is a equal to a÷b? b

Whyis a ÷c equalto a ×d? Whyisthisstilltrueevenifa,b,canddaren’tintegers? bd bc

What does e + π mean and how can we evaluate it? What is the difference in the meaning of the equals sign between x2 −1 = 0, x2 −1 = (x−1)(x+1), (x2 −1)/(x−1) = x+1 and √x2 = x? What does it mean for a line to be straight? Are there lines that are not straight? In Math 499 we will be addressing these questions and more!

In this class we will explore the foundations of mathematics and how we acquire and process mathematical knowledge. We will revisit K-12 mathematics from the point of view of a mathematician. We will explore the roles of metaphors, models, and definitions. We will discuss the use of symbols and see that even in mathematics their meanings are often contextual. We will compare and contrast proofs and convincing arguments and think about the roles they play in developing and understanding mathematics. We will discuss the relationship between mathematics and our physical world and how we use mathematics to understand the physical world. We will consider various algorithms common in K- 12 mathematics and discuss why and how they work. We also will read and discuss the literature on how K-12 mathematics is taught and how we learn and process that knowledge. Throughout the semester, you will also the opportunity to observe and participate in classes at AUGUSTUS HAWKINS High School. This is a new school with a modern curriculum implementing an initiative called the Algebra Project.

This class has no prerequisites. In particular, it is not necessary to have taken any college level math classes; you are only expected to know how to count (albeit fairly well!). However, students must be willing to engage with the material at a mathematically sophisticated level. There will be very little lecturing. There will be a lot of discussion, group work, and both oral and written presentations. This class will be valuable for math majors, anyone with an interest in teaching mathematics, and sociology and psychology majors interested in the science of learning.

David Crombecque

Lecturer

Mathematics Department

crombecq@usc.edu

Course offering: has a service learning component

relevant majors: mathematics, sciences, psychology, sociology,

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BISC 499: Introduction to Genome Science

Characterizing the sequence, function, and evolution of genomes is a central focus of modern biology. In this course, we will learn about the core questions and methods of genome scientists. We will discuss techniques for comprehensively examining organisms at the levels of DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites. We will also talk about how this information is used to determine the molecular basis of phenotypes, such as evolutionary adaptations, crop improvements, and human disease. Lastly, we will spend time on the relationship between genomics and synthetic biology, which is a field that seeks to engineer new features into existing organisms or build new organisms based on present knowledge. The goal of this course is for students to walk away conversant in modern genomics techniques and the biological problems genome researchers hope to solve.

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Let’s Get Started: CV Workshop for Juniors & Seniors

SACNAS USC

Tired of trying to translate your research experiences into a CV?  Bring your laptop with your current CV or résumé.  USC SACNAS Chapter will provide best practices and tips, then graduate students and USC staff will help you write it!  This is a working workshop!

Let’s Get Started:  CV Workshop for Juniors & Seniors

November 19, 2013

4:00 – 5:00 pm

THH 102 (Taper Hall)

Please RSVP at:  http://bit.ly/16howD1

SACNAS Careers in Research Workshop Series