New Course: Math 499: The Foundations of Mathematics and the Acquisition of Mathematical Knowledge

If you would like to reserve a spot in this course, please sign up here: http://goo.gl/forms/Y7qtwqKwM3

This is an extremely unique course, which will involve field experiences with high school students, lots of groupwork, and very little lecture.

In this course we will use K-12 mathematics as a conduit for under-standing the nature of mathematical thought, argument, and problem solving, how humans acquire mathematical knowledge, and how to best teach this material to children.

We will revisit K-12 mathematics from the point of view of a mathematician. We will explore the roles of metaphors, models, and definitions. We will discuss the use of symbols and see that even in mathematics their meanings are often contextual. We will compare and contrast proofs and convincing arguments and think about the roles they play in developing and understanding mathematics. We will discuss the relationship between mathematics and our physical world and how we use mathematics to understand the physical world. We will consider various algorithms common in K-12 math and discuss why and how they work.

We will read and discuss the literature on how K-12 mathematics is taught and how we learn and process mathematical knowledge.

There will be very little lecturing. There will be a lot of discussion, group work, and both oral and written presentations. There will be a service learning component, in which we work with students at Augustus Hawkins High School. This is a new school with a modern curriculum, implementing an initiative called the Algebra Project.

This class has no prerequisites. In particular, it is not necessary to have taken any college level math classes; you are only expected to know how to count (albeit fairly well!) However, students must be willing to engage with the material at a mathematically sophisticated level.

This class will be valuable for math majors, anyone with a potential interest in teaching mathematics, and sociology and psychology majors interested in the science of learning.

Due to a glitch with the math department, the official course registration is delayed. If you are interested in taking this course in Spring 2015, then please submit your name and email here (http://goo.gl/forms/Y7qtwqKwM3), or email chaskell@usc.edu and we will notify you when you can officially register.

 

 

Teach For America Application Workshop Night

Receive insider tips and tricks for making your Teach For America application stand out from the rest! Hear directly from TFA staff and alum about what it takes to make a great candidate for the corps.

DATE: Tuesday, October 21st
TIME: 6:00- 8:00 PM
LOCATION: SAL 126 Computer Lab

Dinner will be provided for those who RSVP here: http://bit.ly/1EJIm82

Whether you would simply like more information on the application process or already have an application ready to send, TFA at USC is here to support you in your efforts to join the movement for educational equality. We welcome you to bring your resumes for workshopping, essay responses for editing, or even draft emails of recommendation letter requests for proofreading.

TFA application night 10-16

DOD NDSEG Fellowship Information Session

Want to know more about the DOD NDSEG Fellowship?
Information session for USC students with Rachel Levitin, NDSEG Program Manager
Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 2:00-3:30 PM
Tutor Campus Center, TCC 227
RSVP: anbrgfel@usc.edu
DOD NDSEG is for U.S. citizens & nationals in sciences & engineering disciplines
The National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship program is open to applicants who are citizens or nationals of the United States. Students must be enrolled in their final year of undergraduate studies, or have completed less than two full-time years of graduate study in the discipline in which they are applying. The NDSEG funds applicants who will pursue a doctoral degree in one of the following disciplines:
 
Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering
Biosciences
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Cognitive, Neural, and Behavioral Sciences
Computer and Computational Sciences
Electrical Engineering
Geosciences
Materials Science and Engineering
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering
Oceanography
Physics
 
The NDSEG Fellowship Application is now open (https://ndseg.asee.org/), and will close on December 12, 2014, at 5:00 P.M. EST.  

New Course Math for 499 (no math prerequisite)

Math 499 The Foundations of Mathematics and the Acquisition of Mathematical Knowledge Spring 2014

Why is addition commutative but its ‘inverse’ subtraction is not? Why is a equal to a÷b? b

Whyis a ÷c equalto a ×d? Whyisthisstilltrueevenifa,b,canddaren’tintegers? bd bc

What does e + π mean and how can we evaluate it? What is the difference in the meaning of the equals sign between x2 −1 = 0, x2 −1 = (x−1)(x+1), (x2 −1)/(x−1) = x+1 and √x2 = x? What does it mean for a line to be straight? Are there lines that are not straight? In Math 499 we will be addressing these questions and more!

In this class we will explore the foundations of mathematics and how we acquire and process mathematical knowledge. We will revisit K-12 mathematics from the point of view of a mathematician. We will explore the roles of metaphors, models, and definitions. We will discuss the use of symbols and see that even in mathematics their meanings are often contextual. We will compare and contrast proofs and convincing arguments and think about the roles they play in developing and understanding mathematics. We will discuss the relationship between mathematics and our physical world and how we use mathematics to understand the physical world. We will consider various algorithms common in K- 12 mathematics and discuss why and how they work. We also will read and discuss the literature on how K-12 mathematics is taught and how we learn and process that knowledge. Throughout the semester, you will also the opportunity to observe and participate in classes at AUGUSTUS HAWKINS High School. This is a new school with a modern curriculum implementing an initiative called the Algebra Project.

This class has no prerequisites. In particular, it is not necessary to have taken any college level math classes; you are only expected to know how to count (albeit fairly well!). However, students must be willing to engage with the material at a mathematically sophisticated level. There will be very little lecturing. There will be a lot of discussion, group work, and both oral and written presentations. This class will be valuable for math majors, anyone with an interest in teaching mathematics, and sociology and psychology majors interested in the science of learning.

David Crombecque

Lecturer

Mathematics Department

crombecq@usc.edu

Course offering: has a service learning component

relevant majors: mathematics, sciences, psychology, sociology,

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Let’s Get Started: CV Workshop for Juniors & Seniors

SACNAS USC

Tired of trying to translate your research experiences into a CV?  Bring your laptop with your current CV or résumé.  USC SACNAS Chapter will provide best practices and tips, then graduate students and USC staff will help you write it!  This is a working workshop!

Let’s Get Started:  CV Workshop for Juniors & Seniors

November 19, 2013

4:00 – 5:00 pm

THH 102 (Taper Hall)

Please RSVP at:  http://bit.ly/16howD1

SACNAS Careers in Research Workshop Series

New Course: MATH-499 Foundations of Mathematics and the Acquisition of Mathematical Knowledge

There is a new service learning class in the Department of Mathematics called the Foundations of Mathematics and the Acquisition of Mathematical Knowledge (flyer below).  It will meet for the first time in Spring 2014. 

The course will explore the foundations of mathematics and how we acquire and process mathematical knowledge.  The class has no prerequisites and will be valuable for math majors, anyone with an interest in teaching mathematics, and sociology and psychology majors interested in the science of learning.

For more details, please contact the instructor, David Crombecque, at crombecq@usc.edu.

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Workshops for undergrads interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics

Thinking Ahead:  Could I be a Researcher?

A SACNAS Careers in Research Workshop

October 29, 2013

4:00 – 5:00 pm

THH 102

Sponsored by the USC SACNAS Chapter, this workshop features a panel of USC researchers explaining the importance of research in society and sharing their paths into the sciences.  This is the first of a series of professional development workshops called Careers in Research designed to expose students to research.

SACNAS, the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science, is an inclusive organization for all people and all disciplines dedicated to promoting academic excellence and mentoring students to advanced degrees in STEM fields. http://sacnas.org/   The goal of the USC SACNAS Chapter is to create a community at USC for all students in all disciplines interested in research.

Students can register at this link:

https://usccollege.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0fBx5mv0v7bs10w

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