ZYGO Series—MEDICINE IN THE MEDIA: Ethical Obligations to Viewers

MEDICINE IN THE MEDIA: Ethical Obligations to Viewers
ZYGO Student Lunchtime Series on Ethics in Medicine
February 20, 2015
| 12:30-2 PM | Doheny Memorial Library, Room 241
Lunch Provided | RSVP: http://bit.ly/1FYG8RG

Medically themed TV shows cover a wide range of genres; they include comedies such as Scrubs, dramas such as Grey’s Anatomy, and soap operas such as General Hospital—the longest-running American soap opera currently in production. Too often the scientific-relevance of treatments presented on such shows is difficult to grasp and inaccurate. Research presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting in 2010 accordingly found that 46 percent of seizure cases depicted on medical dramas were subject to inappropriate treatments.

Along these lines, American news outlets are often criticized for presenting health-related news items in a sensationalist and distorted manner. Panelists for this event will consider the relationship between health issues and their representations in the media. Do TV producers and filmmakers have any ethical obligations to accurately present medical cases? How do current depictions of health on TV and in the news impact the way viewers seek out and view medical treatment?

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director
Panelists:
Doe Mayer, Mary Pickford Professor of Film and Television, USC School of Cinematic Arts, and Professor, USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
Armine Kourouyan, MPH, Project Manager, Hollywood, Health & Society, USC Annenberg Norman Lear Center
Lara Bradshaw, Ph.D. Student, Critical Studies, USC School of Cinematic Arts
William Reckner, Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy, University of California, Los Angeles

Cosponsored by the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

USC LEVAN INSTITUTE FOR HUMANITIES AND ETHICS
The USC Levan Institute engages students with the timeless values at the core of our humanity, promotes moral reflection and understanding of self, facilitates multidisciplinary dialogue, and encourages students to make a positive impact across society and the globe.

University of Southern California
Contact: Dr. Lyn Boyd Judson, Director
usclevan@dornsife.usc.edu

SPEECH WITHOUT BORDERS: Disentangling Free Speech, Hate Speech, Irreligious Speech, and Seditious Speech

A Levan Coffeehouse Conversation on Practical Ethics
February 11, 2015, Noon | Ground Zero Cafe | Lunch Provided
RSVP:
 http://bit.ly/1DnObIi

The recent massacre at the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Saudi Arabia’s caning of a blogger for religiously offensive speech, and the French government’s crackdown on speech in support of terrorism have intensified debate worldwide over the meaning and limits of public expression.  What sorts of speech should be protected and on what grounds? More

Coffeehouse Conversations Program Director and Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Panelists:
Ed McCann, Professor of Philosophy and English, USC Dornsife
Varun Soni, USC Dean of Religious Life
Marc Cooper, Associate Professor of Professional Practice, USC Annenberg
Arjun Ahuja, Inquisitive Student, Philosophy, Politics and Law, USC Dornsife

HUGO SLIM: “Humanitarian Action in the Syrian Crisis: Obstacles and Innovations”

Wednesday, February 11, 2015 | 4 PM | Herklotz Room, Doheny Memorial Library (DML 233)
**UPDATED LOCATION**
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1BiLUvN

Hugo Slim is the University of Oxford Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict Associate Director and Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Politics and International Relations. From 1983-1994, he worked as a frontline humanitarian worker for Save the Children UK and the United Nations in Morocco, Sudan and Ethiopia, the Palestinian Territories and Bangladesh. He is currently leading research on humanitarian ethics that will deliver the first major practical text on humanitarian ethics in war and disaster and will develop new standards of care and accountability in humanitarian organizations. Dr. Slim is the lead instructor for the USC Levan Institute-Oxford Workshops.

Organizing Sponsor: USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics

Cosponsors: Cosponsors: International Human Rights Clinic, USC Gould School of Law; USC Center for International Studies; USC Spectrum; USC Program Board Speakers Committee; Oxford Consortium for Human Rights; and Levan Institute Undergraduate Fellows

Announcing a Call for Submissions – ‘The Social Justice Review’

sjr cover photo

Are you a voice for social justice?

Want to have your work read around the world? The Social Justice Review (SJR), a journal sponsored by the USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics, is now accepting outstanding submissions for publication in our inaugural Spring 2015 issue.

While our final deadline is not until midnight on February 9th, early submissions are welcome – whether creative or academic in nature.

Visit us online at www.socialjusticereview.com to learn more.

As a global platform for social justiceThe Social Justice Review offers a forum for undergraduates worldwide who engage—utilizing the written word—with issues of ethnicity, socio-economic status, gender, religion, or other social issues or inequalities.

Managed and edited by students at USC, The Social Justice Review seeks polished, mindfully-crafted undergraduate submissions that resonate with our socially conscious readership—academic, fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, memoir, hybrid prose, etc. We believe in the power of research, narrative, and storytelling as a means of advocating for a more socially just world.

Dornsife Degrees Get Jobs! Learn From Successful Alumni

Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Time: 4:00pm-5:00pm
Location: Trojan Presentation Room (TPR), Student Union B3 (basement)

Are you trying to figure out your career choices after college? Ever wonder what you can do with your undergraduate degree?

A student’s major does not dictate their career options or possibilities. The Dornsife Advising Office will be hosting a panel of Dornsife Alumni who graduated from the college with one major and are now successfully employed in a different field. The panel will consist of alumni from a range of majors including Spanish, Economics, Psychology, Political Science, and Art History who are now working in areas such as sales, research, business, law, and management. Learn about their experiences as undergraduates and how they were able to able to make the most of their time at USC.  Discover the importance of transferable skills and how they contribute to your success when searching for a job and internship.

ZYGO Series – QUARANTINE: Balancing Human Rights with Medical Best Interests

ZYGO Series—QUARANTINE: Balancing Human Rights with Medical Best Interests
Friday, January 23, 2014, Doheny Memorial Library 241 | 12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch Provided
RSVP:  http://bit.ly/1Cf8IxO
More Information: http://dornsife.usc.edu/zygo-series

The first known usage of quarantine dates back from 1377 in the city of Dubrovnik, Croatia when ships suspected of carrying the Black Plague were subjected to a 40 day hold before being allowed to enter the port. Quarantine is distinct from isolation in that it is solely a preventive measure enacted to seclude individuals who may be at risk of spreading a certain disease.

Although quarantine has not been frequently implemented in recent history, during the recent outbreak of Ebola, entire villages in Liberia were subjected to quarantines, and in the US, multiple states implemented mandatory quarantines for health care workers returning from West Africa. These quarantine policies were heavily criticized by many as violating basic human rights and simply being unnecessary. Panelists for this forum will consider the medical relevance and necessity of quarantine and the human rights concerns associated with it.

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Panelists:
Sofia Gruskin, J.D., MIA, Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine and Gould School of Law, and Director, Program on Global Health & Human Rights, Keck School of Medicine
Alison Dundes Renteln, Professor of Political Science, Anthropology, and Policy, Planning, and Development, USC Dornsife
Paul Holtom, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Orthopedics and Program Director, Infectious Disease Fellowship Program, Keck School of Medicine
Abelard Podgorski, Ph.D. Student, Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Jacob Roberts, Undergraduate Student, Economics and East Asian Languages and Cultures, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

Problems without Passports in Dakar, Senegal

Dakar, Senegal awaits! Culture, cuisine, history, nightlife, and beaches…experience all of these while learning about and researching Senegal’s rich literary traditions and contemporary literati.

This Problems without Passports class, French 499, invites any and all students with a good knowledge of French (intermediate recommended) to apply for this unique course. After one week at USC, we will travel to Dakar, Senegal to spend three weeks with writers, publishers, artists, Senegalese university students, and the like. USC students in anthropology, comparative literature, history, global studies, IR, narrative studies, global health, ASE, sociology, and of course, French, would all gain from this opportunity. For example, if you’re interested in history, your research could focus on writers whose works rewrite and reimagine postcolonial history. Global health? Choose a novel that treats disability and/or disease in Senegal.

INFO SESSION to be held Tuesday, January 27, 3 – 4:30pm in Taper 120.

Refreshments served!