Dornsife Degrees Get Jobs! Learn From Successful Alumni

Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Time: 4:00pm-5:00pm
Location: Trojan Presentation Room (TPR), Student Union B3 (basement)

Are you trying to figure out your career choices after college? Ever wonder what you can do with your undergraduate degree?

A student’s major does not dictate their career options or possibilities. The Dornsife Advising Office will be hosting a panel of Dornsife Alumni who graduated from the college with one major and are now successfully employed in a different field. The panel will consist of alumni from a range of majors including Spanish, Economics, Psychology, Political Science, and Art History who are now working in areas such as sales, research, business, law, and management. Learn about their experiences as undergraduates and how they were able to able to make the most of their time at USC.  Discover the importance of transferable skills and how they contribute to your success when searching for a job and internship.

ZYGO Series – QUARANTINE: Balancing Human Rights with Medical Best Interests

ZYGO Series—QUARANTINE: Balancing Human Rights with Medical Best Interests
Friday, January 23, 2014, Doheny Memorial Library 241 | 12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch Provided
RSVP:  http://bit.ly/1Cf8IxO
More Information: http://dornsife.usc.edu/zygo-series

The first known usage of quarantine dates back from 1377 in the city of Dubrovnik, Croatia when ships suspected of carrying the Black Plague were subjected to a 40 day hold before being allowed to enter the port. Quarantine is distinct from isolation in that it is solely a preventive measure enacted to seclude individuals who may be at risk of spreading a certain disease.

Although quarantine has not been frequently implemented in recent history, during the recent outbreak of Ebola, entire villages in Liberia were subjected to quarantines, and in the US, multiple states implemented mandatory quarantines for health care workers returning from West Africa. These quarantine policies were heavily criticized by many as violating basic human rights and simply being unnecessary. Panelists for this forum will consider the medical relevance and necessity of quarantine and the human rights concerns associated with it.

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Panelists:
Sofia Gruskin, J.D., MIA, Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine and Gould School of Law, and Director, Program on Global Health & Human Rights, Keck School of Medicine
Alison Dundes Renteln, Professor of Political Science, Anthropology, and Policy, Planning, and Development, USC Dornsife
Paul Holtom, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Orthopedics and Program Director, Infectious Disease Fellowship Program, Keck School of Medicine
Abelard Podgorski, Ph.D. Student, Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Jacob Roberts, Undergraduate Student, Economics and East Asian Languages and Cultures, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

Problems without Passports in Dakar, Senegal

Dakar, Senegal awaits! Culture, cuisine, history, nightlife, and beaches…experience all of these while learning about and researching Senegal’s rich literary traditions and contemporary literati.

This Problems without Passports class, French 499, invites any and all students with a good knowledge of French (intermediate recommended) to apply for this unique course. After one week at USC, we will travel to Dakar, Senegal to spend three weeks with writers, publishers, artists, Senegalese university students, and the like. USC students in anthropology, comparative literature, history, global studies, IR, narrative studies, global health, ASE, sociology, and of course, French, would all gain from this opportunity. For example, if you’re interested in history, your research could focus on writers whose works rewrite and reimagine postcolonial history. Global health? Choose a novel that treats disability and/or disease in Senegal.

INFO SESSION to be held Tuesday, January 27, 3 – 4:30pm in Taper 120.

Refreshments served!


Problems without Passports Info Session: Medellín, Colombia 2015

INFORMATION SESSION:  Tuesday, 9 December 2015, 1pm, THH 309J
http://dornsife.usc.edu/colombia-local-context-and-international-relations/

This Problems without Passports program takes intrepid students to Medellín, Colombia to experience the transformation that the city has undergone as the years of strife and conflict were resolved.  Students will study in the living urban laboratory that was named Innovative City of the Year in 2013.  The Wall Street Journal, Citi, and the Urban Land Institute chose Medellín, ahead of New York and Tel Aviv, based on its economy, urban development, culture, and livability as the most innovative city in the world.  The city, previously known for crime and drug trade, shines as a safe and innovative place to live, study, and do business.  It is a vibrant metropolis that is connected by a system of metros, aerial cable cars (metrocable), buses, taxis that make getting around easy and economical.

Medellín is situated in the Andes mountains and offers a temperate climate year-round that makes it “The City of Eternal Spring.”  It is home to the Escuela de Adminstración y Finanazas e Instituto Tecnológico (EAFIT) where the University of Southern California offers this unique summer program with the theme of Conflict and resolution.  We offer two courses that examine how Medellín resolved its social conflict and evolved into a community that celebrates its prominence as the second largest city and economy in Colombia.

Business, educational sectors, and the government have unified to physically unite the social strata of the city.  There are covered escalators to bring the poorest citizens from the outskirts of the city into the city center so that they may integrate themselves into the labor force and benefit from the burgeoning economy.  Business and government have collaborated to create cultural spaces, such as the Modern Art Museum and the Museum of Remembrance, that celebrate the arts and recall the conflict that transformed Medellín.

The universities of the city strive to be welcoming spaces that reflect the importance of education for all, shared social responsibility, and respect the environment in the process.  EAFIT leads the pack in this area.  The Medellín campus is in the city center, an American-style college campus filled with local flora and fauna, where future leaders study and socialize.

ZYGO Series—DOCTORS VS. PARENTS: Decision-making in Pediatrics

Friday, November 21, 2014, Doheny Memorial Library 241 | 12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch Provided
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1xqn0bu
More Information: http://dornsife.usc.edu/zygo-series

Making decisions for children in a medical context can be extremely stressful and complex. In some notable pediatric cases, parents have made decisions that go against the recommendations of doctors. Such cases have included denying treatment for cancer or refusing to allow their children to receive vaccinations. Furthermore, in the case that a child appears to be suffering from serious abuse or neglect, medical centers are now able to forcibly provide care by implementing Child Protective Services (CPS). However, this service has often been criticized for being used incorrectly and simply as a means for health care providers to avoid liabilities.

Panelists for this seminar will discuss how parents and doctors can best make decisions concerning the treatment children should receive. They will also consider how CPS can most appropriately be implemented in a medical setting, and if treatment should be forced if deemed medically necessary.

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Panelists:
Janet Schneiderman
, Research Associate Professor, USC Social Work
Kenneth Geller, MD, Director of Dornsife Pre-Health Advisement, Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, USC Keck
Ankit Shah, MD, JD, Assistant Professor, USC Keck, Lecturer in Law, USC Gould, Attending Physician, LAC+USC Medical Center
Rima Basu, Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL ETHICS BOWL 2014

Saturday, December 6, 2014 | USC University Park Campus 

The Levan Institute is​ looking for student volunteers and faculty moderators for the Southern California High School Ethics Bowl. The event will be held on USC’s University Park Campus. If interested, please contact Janet Kramer at usclevan@dornsife.usc.edu.

Learn More: http://dornsife.usc.edu/high-school-ethics-bowl
Hosted by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics​

“Medicine and the Image: The Visible Human” Fall 2014 Conference and Public Gallery Exhibit

Conference
Wednesday, November 5, 2014 | 8:30 AM – 7:00 PM
Doheny Memorial Library, Room 240

Students are welcome to join sessions in-between classes
CONFERENCE PROGRAM: http://bit.ly/1sZpJsV
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1wASjyA 

Public Gallery Exhibit
Monday, November 3 – Friday, November 7, 2014
Von KleinSmid Center Courtyard

From the anatomical drawings of Vesalius to contemporary MRI and CT scans, images create and popularize medical knowledge as well as influence diagnosis and treatment. This one-day conference will explore how the human body and its experiences of illness are imagined and made visible in medical research, practice, and education. How does representation, both visual and literary, construct and complicate facts about a medically knowable body? How does it also change our individual and societal perceptions of illness, disease, and health? In what ways do technological advances in imaging techniques, including virtual reality simulations, influence medical practices? How can the analysis and creation of art enrich medical education?

The conference aims to facilitate an interdisciplinary conversation by bringing together scholars from a variety of fields including Art, History, Literature, Communications, Anthropology, Medical Illustration, and Medicine. Events for the day will include research presentations on the relationship between medicine and images; a career roundtable for students interested in the health humanities; a keynote lecture on the use of entertainment applications at the intersection of behavioral science, medicine and public health; and a public gallery exhibit of medical images.

FEATURED SESSION
ROUNDTABLE ON CAREERS IN THE HEALTH HUMANITIES & ARTS | 1:30-3:00 PM
ChairOctavio Avila, Director of Student Special Services, USC Dornsife
Lise Patt, Director, Institute for Cultural Inquiry
Jamie Sweetman, Artist and Adjunct Faculty, USC Roski School of Design
Megan Rosenbloom, Associate Director, Collection Resources Division, Norris Medical Library, USC
Leslie Davis, Artist and Curator, “The Art of Stem Cells” exhibit, The Orange County Center for Contemporary Art (OCCCA) 

Organizing Sponsor: USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics
Co-Sponsors: USC Office of the Provost, Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study, Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, Dornsife Science and Health Program, Center for Feminist Research, Department of Comparative Literature, Comparative Studies in Literature and Culture Doctoral Program, Visual Studies Research Institute, and Keck School of Medicine’s Program in Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics