“Medicine and the Image: The Visible Human” Fall 2014 Conference and Public Gallery Exhibit

Conference
Wednesday, November 5, 2014 | 8:30 AM – 7:00 PM
Doheny Memorial Library, Room 240

Students are welcome to join sessions in-between classes
CONFERENCE PROGRAM: http://bit.ly/1sZpJsV
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1wASjyA 

Public Gallery Exhibit
Monday, November 3 – Friday, November 7, 2014
Von KleinSmid Center Courtyard

From the anatomical drawings of Vesalius to contemporary MRI and CT scans, images create and popularize medical knowledge as well as influence diagnosis and treatment. This one-day conference will explore how the human body and its experiences of illness are imagined and made visible in medical research, practice, and education. How does representation, both visual and literary, construct and complicate facts about a medically knowable body? How does it also change our individual and societal perceptions of illness, disease, and health? In what ways do technological advances in imaging techniques, including virtual reality simulations, influence medical practices? How can the analysis and creation of art enrich medical education?

The conference aims to facilitate an interdisciplinary conversation by bringing together scholars from a variety of fields including Art, History, Literature, Communications, Anthropology, Medical Illustration, and Medicine. Events for the day will include research presentations on the relationship between medicine and images; a career roundtable for students interested in the health humanities; a keynote lecture on the use of entertainment applications at the intersection of behavioral science, medicine and public health; and a public gallery exhibit of medical images.

FEATURED SESSION
ROUNDTABLE ON CAREERS IN THE HEALTH HUMANITIES & ARTS | 1:30-3:00 PM
ChairOctavio Avila, Director of Student Special Services, USC Dornsife
Lise Patt, Director, Institute for Cultural Inquiry
Jamie Sweetman, Artist and Adjunct Faculty, USC Roski School of Design
Megan Rosenbloom, Associate Director, Collection Resources Division, Norris Medical Library, USC
Leslie Davis, Artist and Curator, “The Art of Stem Cells” exhibit, The Orange County Center for Contemporary Art (OCCCA) 

Organizing Sponsor: USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics
Co-Sponsors: USC Office of the Provost, Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study, Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, Center for Feminist Research, Department of Comparative Literature, Comparative Studies in Literature and Culture Doctoral Program, Visual Studies Research Institute, and Keck School of Medicine’s Program in Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics

Women and War featuring Nimmi Gowrinathan

WOMEN AND WAR featuring Nimmi Gowrinathan
October 23, 2014, TCC 350 | 7-9 PM
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1sZr3Mt

Join us for this talk on women and war zones. While women are often framed as victims in war zones, they are often also political actors, occupying a variety of roles in violent spaces. Women are by and large disproportionately impacted by the fallout of war (displacement, militarization, and rape). These experiences shape women in marginalized communities in distinct ways. In Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Afghanistan and elsewhere, lived experiences with violence often shape the politics of women, forcing us to recognize that women can be both victims and agents in complex conflicts around the world.

More: http://bit.ly/1053eXQ

Co-Sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics, the Office of Religious Life, and USC Spectrum

Exploring China: Legal, Regulatory and Cultural Aspects

International Regulatory Science Symposium
Exploring China: Legal, Regulatory and Cultural Aspects
 
Don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear from the leaders in China Biomedical industry!
 
China poses both enormous economic potential and uncertain business risk for the biomedical industry that would like to tap into its expanding economy, aging population and growing talent pool.  Its rapid rise in GDP, establishment of social infrastructure, and efforts to incentivize domestic R&D continue to attract companies to invest in the market and explore opportunities amidst rapidly changing environment.
 
This one-day symposium will feature speakers from industry, academia, and government to present current developments, issues, and challenges facing the biomedical industry in China.
 
Agenda Highlights:
China’s Role in Biomedical Industry: Past, Present, and Future 
Medical Device Regulation 
Health System and Policy
Medical Insurance Systems in China 
Medical Device Evaluation
Innovation and Start-ups 
Practical Aspects of Chinese Law 
Intellectual Property Considerations
 
Featured speakers include:
Dan Harris, JD, Harris Moure, Seattle, Washington
Helen Niu, MD, PhD, Head, Senior Director, China Clinical Development of Allergan, Beijing, China
Annie Yin, DBA, Regulatory Affairs Director, Medtronic Inc., Beijing, China
Click here for speakers’ bios
 
Who should attend:
Biomedical and Medtech industry professionals and executives
Faculty, students, and staff interested in learning about this exciting field
 
We look forward to welcoming you on November 1st!

MDA 325, Case Studies in Modern Leadership

MDA 325, Case Studies in Modern Leadership
Offered Spring 2015 and co-taught by Professor Gordon Brown, former Prime Minister of Great Britain, and Professor Steve Lamy, USC Dornsife Vice Dean for Academic Programs

USC students have a special opportunity this spring to study with a world leader, together with one of USC’s most highly rated professors, in an intensive study of international politics and economics.  MDA 325, Case Studies in Modern Leadership (section 42295), is a special two-unit course open to all undergraduate students.  The class will meet from Tuesday, April 7th to Thursday, April 16th from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. and once at the beginning of the spring semester.  Some of the topics planned to be discussed include the world financial crisis of 2008, climate change and the summit of 2009, global growth and the role of the U.S., the role of the United Nations in regards to poverty, education and disease, and an analysis of what the world may look like in 2025.

Dornsife Washington, D.C. Program

USC Dornsife is offering students a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to study foreign policy as it’s being made, and to intern with their choice of NGO, think tank, or governmental agency – all while earning course credit. Classes will be offered in foreign policy, espionage and intelligence, and international security, with visits from policymakers to explain firsthand how the system works. For the cost of full-time enrollment at USC (scholarships apply!) and local living expenses, you will experience life in the heart of Washington, D.C., getting inside information from practicing policy experts and gaining valuable  work experience in the field of international affairs. Open to anyone interested in working in the policy world. Not limited to International Relations or Political Science majors!
Courses Offered:
IR 304: Espionage Intelligence
IR 305: Managing New Global Challenges (in 4-week modules)
IR 443: Formulation of U.S. Foreign Policy
IR 391: Directed Field Study (Internship)
Interested?
Contact  dornsifedc@usc.edu or attend one of our informational meetings:
Sept. 24th at 5:30 PM | Leavey Library Auditorium
Oct. 8th at 5:30 PM | VKC 300a

Pi Sigma Alpha Honors Society, Spring 2014 Application

POSC Juniors & Seniors:

Applications are now available for membership in Pi Sigma Alpha, the National Political Science Honor Society. To be eligible, you must meet the following minimum requirements:

1) Be at least a Junior majoring in POSC or IR

2) Have completed a minimum of three (3) upper division POSC/IR courses

3) Have at least a 3.5 overall GPA

4) Have a minimum 3.5 GPA in all POSC/IR courses

If you meet the above requirements, you may fill out the attached application (also available in VKC 214, 301, and 327). Applications are due no later than Monday, FEBRUARY 10, 2014, by 5 pm in VKC 327.

IR class Spring 2014

IR 311 is designed for students interested in independent research to prepare them for honors and graduate fellowships (Fulbright, Marshall, Mitchell, Gates, etc.). 

In IR 311, students will learn in a structured fashion how to design a research question, how to select their cases, how to develop hypotheses, how to situate their question in terms of the larger literature, and then how to embark on their independent research in the field, through interviews, surveys or in the archives for historical material. 

In IR 311, students will write a research proposal (similar to that required for Fulbright), a literature review that places their research question in context of the current research (to be included in their spring application for honors), and a research design that combines the research proposal with the literature review and plans the data collection and hypothesis testing. 

There are no exams. IR 311 is offered this semester on Tuesdays from 2-4:50pm, though waivers for course conflicts will be considered with appropriate alternative one-on-one time  added at another time.