Cancer Research Internship

Cancer Research Internship
Keck School of Medicine of USC
GWAS of Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics

The GWAS of Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics is a NIH-funded, population-based, case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) that will investigate the genetic risk factors for colorectal cancer in Hispanics. We plan to recruit 2,500 Hispanic men and women diagnosed with colorectal cancer using population-based cancer registries in California. We are seeking students as interns to assist in patient recruitment and interviews. We are looking for motivated students interested in becoming involved and making an impact in our cancer research study to begin this semester. Potential applicants will play an important role by directly interacting with colorectal cancer patient participants and contributing to the first study of its kind in the Hispanic population.

Duties will involve:

  • Attending and participating in training sessions and meetings
  • Initiating contact with potential study participants
  • Scheduling participants for interviews
  • Conducting thorough and detailed study interviews in English and Spanish (by telephone)
  • Entering data clearly and completely into a tracking database
  • Maintaining study documents
  • Other duties as needed
  • Commitment of at least 10 hrs/week

Qualifications:
Current full or part-time USC student; have general computer knowledge; be flexible, organized, reliable and dependable; detail-oriented; excellent personal and telephone communication skills; fluency in Spanish; paid position after training period

Students should be willing to commit to at least 10 hours per week. The position will be based in the Norris Topping Tower on the Health Sciences Campus. Interns will have flexibility in scheduling and work hours will be available during weekdays and weekends in the morning, afternoon and evening. Special consideration will be given to students during university holidays, breaks and final exam periods.

To be considered for this position, please contact Ugonna Ilhenacho at ugonna.ihenacho@med.usc.edu with your cover letter, resume and available days/hours.

Problems without Passports in Dakar, Senegal

Dakar, Senegal awaits! Culture, cuisine, history, nightlife, and beaches…experience all of these while learning about and researching Senegal’s rich literary traditions and contemporary literati.

This Problems without Passports class, French 499, invites any and all students with a good knowledge of French (intermediate recommended) to apply for this unique course. After one week at USC, we will travel to Dakar, Senegal to spend three weeks with writers, publishers, artists, Senegalese university students, and the like. USC students in anthropology, comparative literature, history, global studies, IR, narrative studies, global health, ASE, sociology, and of course, French, would all gain from this opportunity. For example, if you’re interested in history, your research could focus on writers whose works rewrite and reimagine postcolonial history. Global health? Choose a novel that treats disability and/or disease in Senegal.

INFO SESSION to be held Tuesday, January 27, 3 – 4:30pm in Taper 120.

Refreshments served!


Dean’s Special Lecture – Convergent Science: Life Sciences and Engineering in Oncology

Dean’s Special Lecture
January 26th 2015
Convergent Science: Life Sciences and Engineering in Oncology
Peter Kuhn, Dean’s Professor of Biological Sciences
3 P.M., Lecture / Reception to FollowJoyce J. Cammilleri Hall, Dornsife Neuroscience Pavillion

A biological transition point is the initial, instigating change that occurs when a cancer transitions from benign to malignant, from local to distant or from treatment-sensitive to treatment-resistant. However, medicine is limited currently to treating the corresponding clinical transition point — the time at which this change is first detected due to an amassed population of changed cells. Learn more about how Peter Kuhn employs physical science and biological methods to study the factors that affect biological transition points in order to improve clinical decision-making and mitigate the damage caused by delayed clinical detection. By studying the changes occurring within individual tumor cells, within patients’ organ systems, and within populations of patients to chart the dynamic course of cancer evolution, he is working to better predict and thus better treat this ever-changing disease.

For more information and to RSVP please contact events@dornsife.usc.edu

Stay up-to-date on the latest USC Dornsife happenings at dornsife.usc.edu/events.

Volunteer with USC Caruso Catholic Center

Are you interested in giving back to the USC community? Are you looking for a flexible volunteer opportunity that looks great on your resume? The USC Caruso Catholic Center is currently in need of tutors for the Spring semester in all subjects! Whether it’s English, Math, Choir, or Sports we are accepting tutors during school hours and after school hours. If you are interested please contact: sasha@catholictrojan.org.

ZYGO Series—DOCTORS VS. PARENTS: Decision-making in Pediatrics

Friday, November 21, 2014, Doheny Memorial Library 241 | 12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch Provided
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1xqn0bu
More Information: http://dornsife.usc.edu/zygo-series

Making decisions for children in a medical context can be extremely stressful and complex. In some notable pediatric cases, parents have made decisions that go against the recommendations of doctors. Such cases have included denying treatment for cancer or refusing to allow their children to receive vaccinations. Furthermore, in the case that a child appears to be suffering from serious abuse or neglect, medical centers are now able to forcibly provide care by implementing Child Protective Services (CPS). However, this service has often been criticized for being used incorrectly and simply as a means for health care providers to avoid liabilities.

Panelists for this seminar will discuss how parents and doctors can best make decisions concerning the treatment children should receive. They will also consider how CPS can most appropriately be implemented in a medical setting, and if treatment should be forced if deemed medically necessary.

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Panelists:
Janet Schneiderman
, Research Associate Professor, USC Social Work
Kenneth Geller, MD, Director of Dornsife Pre-Health Advisement, Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, USC Keck
Ankit Shah, MD, JD, Assistant Professor, USC Keck, Lecturer in Law, USC Gould, Attending Physician, LAC+USC Medical Center
Rima Basu, Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

Film Screening: “Northern Light” Levan Institute Cinema of Substance Series

Tuesday, November 11, 2014, The Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108 | 7 PM 

RSVP:  http://bit.ly/1EhYFpv  ​

Winner, Most Innovative Feature, 2013 Visions Du Réel, Switzerland
Winner, Best Cinematography, 2013 New Orleans Film Festival, Louisiana

Set against the backdrop of a town’s annual snowmobile race, Northern Light interweaves captivating stories of recession-era America. The lives of three families change profoundly in the north woods of Michigan, where winters are unforgiving, jobs are hard to come by, and the line between living life and merely surviving is razor-thin.

“Cool in tone and temperature, Nick Bentgen’s Northern Light turns white vistas and blue language into a sneakily compelling, endlessly patient observation of three working-class families in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.”

—Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

The Cinema of Substance Series showcases meaningful films from around the world that explore who we are and how we might be.

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the School of Cinematic Arts

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS: LEVAN-OXFORD SPRING 2015 WORKSHOP

Human Rights In and After Conflict | March 21 – March 27, 2015 | Oxford, UK

The Levan Institute partners with the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict annually to offer a workshop at the University of Oxford. Areas of study include human rights in and after conflict, humanitarian action, conflict trends, human rights law, and peacemaking with a focus on recent armed conflicts. The module is a healthy mix of seminars, working groups, and student presentations.

From Marissa Roy, Dornsife Philosophy, Politics and Law ’14 and Annenberg MA Public Diplomacy ’14
“I gained a much clearer idea of what humanitarian work looks like in the field and what challenges humanitarian workers face. I hope that, as a law student with political aspirations, this perspective will help me craft policies that keep in mind the realities of the field.”

More Information and To Apply: http://dornsife.usc.edu/levan-oxford-workshops
Deadline to Apply: Monday, December 1, 2014

Photos from the Levan-Oxford Spring 2014 Workshop: http://bit.ly/10N4nmv

Read about the Spring 2014 Levan-Oxford Workshop in USC Dornsife News “Humanitarian Spring”: http://bit.ly/118Vx3i​