ZYGO Series—DOCTORS VS. PARENTS: Decision-making in Pediatrics

Friday, November 21, 2014, Doheny Memorial Library 241 | 12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch Provided
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1xqn0bu
More Information: http://dornsife.usc.edu/zygo-series

Making decisions for children in a medical context can be extremely stressful and complex. In some notable pediatric cases, parents have made decisions that go against the recommendations of doctors. Such cases have included denying treatment for cancer or refusing to allow their children to receive vaccinations. Furthermore, in the case that a child appears to be suffering from serious abuse or neglect, medical centers are now able to forcibly provide care by implementing Child Protective Services (CPS). However, this service has often been criticized for being used incorrectly and simply as a means for health care providers to avoid liabilities.

Panelists for this seminar will discuss how parents and doctors can best make decisions concerning the treatment children should receive. They will also consider how CPS can most appropriately be implemented in a medical setting, and if treatment should be forced if deemed medically necessary.

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Panelists:
Janet Schneiderman
, Research Associate Professor, USC Social Work
Kenneth Geller, MD, Director of Dornsife Pre-Health Advisement, Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, USC Keck
Ankit Shah, MD, JD, Assistant Professor, USC Keck, Lecturer in Law, USC Gould, Attending Physician, LAC+USC Medical Center
Rima Basu, Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

Ask @DeanSteveKay About #Koolscience

#KS_Instagram

USC Dornsife Dean Steve Kay invites you to ask him questions about his research and scientific expertise on Twitter at @DeanSteveKay (http://twitter.com/DeanSteveKay) using the hashtag #Koolscience. Kay regularly uses this hashtag to call out interesting scientific news on Twitter.

One of the top experts on genes and circadian rhythms, Dr. Kay’s research is contributing to the development of new drugs that treat metabolic disorders such as Type 2 diabetes as well as to understanding how plants can better adapt to climate change. And he was recently named by Thomson Reuters as one of “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds.”

Dr. Kay welcomes questions on everything from food security and GMOs to the best time of day to make a big decision. Below are links to more information about his laboratory and research as well as links to media outlets in which he has offered expert commentary.

Submit your questions on Twitter by Friday, November 7 and follow @DeanSteveKay (http://twitter.com/DeanSteveKay) to find out the answers to your questions on Nov. 12-14, 2014.

For those who are not on Twitter, you may submit your question online: https://jfe.qualtrics.com/form/SV_eh3ZQsVEPLlNmpT.

More details at http://dornsife.usc.edu/koolscience/

Graduate School: The STEM Major Approach

Are you in love with science? Do you plan to pursue a PhD? Well, what’s your next step? Join The Center for Excellence in Teaching Undergraduate Fellows for a stimulating and informative workshop on how to properly prepare for graduate school. Learn about the admissions process, and what graduate school admission officers want in an applicant.

Panelists include:
-Steve Lund (Earth Sciences Faculty Graduate Advisor)
-Dawn Burke (Biological Sciences Graduate Advisor)
-Chih-Chieh Hsu (Electrical Engineering Graduate Student)

This event will be held on Thursday, October 30th, 2014 from 3:30pm to 4:30pm in VKC 100. Pizza and drinks will be provided on a first come, first served basis.

Please RSVP for this event here: http://bit.ly/1wqT3aW.

Ice Age Discoveries Deep Beneath the Yucatan

Ice Age Discoveries Deep Beneath the Yucatan
Underwater ancient caves. Early humans in America.

Dominique Rissolo
Waitt Foundation and University of California, San Diego

A young woman’s skeleton has been discovered deep beneath the Yucatan. It is the oldest, most complete yet found in the Americas.

Underwater cave systems of the Yucatan Peninsula are a promising frontier for finding and understanding early people in America. Since the last glacial maximum, a maze of passageways beneath the Yucatan has flooded. Rising sea levels have covered remains of animals and humans dating to the Late Pleistocene.

A new picture is emerging from osteological and taphonomic analyses; absolute dating of human, faunal, macrobotanical, and geological samples; human DNA analyses; and hydrogeology and sedimentology and multi-proxy paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Innovate recording and imaging techniques are enabling researchers to analyze archaeological remains with minimal impact to the site and the remains.

Thursday Oct 23rd 4 pm
USC ACB 238
Refreshments
Sponsored by USC Archaeology

DOD NDSEG Fellowship Information Session

Want to know more about the DOD NDSEG Fellowship?
Information session for USC students with Rachel Levitin, NDSEG Program Manager
Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 2:00-3:30 PM
Tutor Campus Center, TCC 227
RSVP: anbrgfel@usc.edu
DOD NDSEG is for U.S. citizens & nationals in sciences & engineering disciplines
The National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship program is open to applicants who are citizens or nationals of the United States. Students must be enrolled in their final year of undergraduate studies, or have completed less than two full-time years of graduate study in the discipline in which they are applying. The NDSEG funds applicants who will pursue a doctoral degree in one of the following disciplines:
 
Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering
Biosciences
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Cognitive, Neural, and Behavioral Sciences
Computer and Computational Sciences
Electrical Engineering
Geosciences
Materials Science and Engineering
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering
Oceanography
Physics
 
The NDSEG Fellowship Application is now open (https://ndseg.asee.org/), and will close on December 12, 2014, at 5:00 P.M. EST.  

Job Announcement: Joint Educational Project (JEP) – Science Education Teaching Assistant

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT
Joint Educational Project (JEP)– YOUNG SCIENTISTS PROGRAM
USC ReadersPlus

Science Education Teaching Assistant

JEP is searching for two undergraduate students pursuing degrees in the sciences with at least one year to commit to the Young Scientists Program (YSP). The YSP Teaching Assistants will be placed at five elementary schools in our immediate USC community to teach hands-on science lessons that will support teachers and students in science education.

This position requires:

  • An interest in science education;
  • Strong communication skills;
  • Strong organization skills;
  • Ability to manage multiple tasks and responsibilities;
  • A self-starter, able to take initiative and work independently;
  • 5 hours per week available to dedicate to the position (pay rate $10/hour);
  • Attendance at regular staff meetings.

Job responsibilities include:

  • Presenting meaningful, hands-on science lessons that will be implemented in the at assigned school;
  • Organizing and maintaining the Science Lab Materials at the school;
  • Assisting classroom teachers and students with science activities to promote the development of science education;
  • Other responsibilities which match specific program needs.

To apply, contact Tina Koneazny:
koneazny@usc.edu
Deadline to apply: Friday, September 5th, 2014

Fall 2014 Archaeology courses

Fall 2014 Interdisciplinary Archaeology courses.

The minor requires only five courses, one of which may count towards GE.  See below for minor requirements and course descriptions.

ONE LOWER DIVISION COURSE FROM:

  • AHIS-120g “Foundations of Western Art” Malone, TTh 12:30-1:50pm
  • AHIS-125g “Arts of Asia: Antiquity to 1300″ Sonya, MW 12:00-1:50pm
  • AHIS-128g “Arts of Latin America” Bleichmar, MW 12:00-1:50pm
  • ANTH-200Lg “The Origins of Humanity” MW 2:00-3:20pm
  • ANTH/CLAS-202 “Archaeology: Our Human Past” Garrison, TTh 9:30-10:50am
  • CHEM 105bL “General Chemistry” Bertolini, MWF 11:00-11:50am
  • ENST-100 “Introduction to Environmental Studies” TTh 9:30-10:50am or 2:00-3:20pm
  • MASC-110L “Materials Science” MWF 11:00-11:50am
  • REL-111g “The World of the Hebrew Bible” Zuckerman, MW 2:00-3:20pm
  • REL-112g “Religions of Egypt and the Ancient Near East” Dodd, TTh 11:00-12:20pm or Th 2:00-2:50pm
  • REL-137g “Introduction to Islam” Jackson, TTh 11:00-12:20pm
  • SSCI-265Lg “The Water Planet” Wilson, TTh 11:00-12:20pm

Upper-division Requirements (16 units)

All students shall be required to take at least one Archaeological Theories and Methods course. Beyond this, students may elect to take either:

A: one additional upper-division course from the Theories and Methods list and two upper-division courses from the Interdisciplinary Perspectives list, or

B: one upper-division course from the Interdisciplinary Perspectives list and two upper-division courses from the Interdisciplinary Applications list.

THEORIES AND METHODS COURSES:

  • AHIS/CLAS-415 “Object-Worlds: Histories and Theories of Things” Yasin, T 2:00-4:50pm

INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES COURSES:

  • AHIS/CLAS-321 “Greek Art and Archaeology” Yasin, TTh 11:00-12:30pm
  • ANTH-300 “Evolution, Ecology, and Culture” Boehm, T 2:00-4:50pm
  • ANTH-310 “Archaeology of the Americas” Garrison, TTh 11:00-12:20pm
  • ANTH-314g “The Nature of Maya Civilization” Garrison, TTh 12:30-1:50pm
  • CLAS-349g “Ancient Empires” TBA
  • JS-378 “Jewish Magic in the Ancient World” Garroway, Hochman, TTh 11:00-12:20pm

INTERDISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS COURSES:

  • CHEM 300L “Analytical Chemistry” Devlin, MWF 10:00-10:50am
  • ENST-320a “Water and Soil Sustainability: Energy and Air Sustainability” MW 2:00-3:20pm or TTh 11:00-12:20pm
  • ENST-320b “Water and Soil Sustainability: Energy and Air Sustainability” MW 2:00-3:20pm
  • GEOL-412 “Oceans, Climate, and the Environment” Feakins, TTh 2:00-3:20pm
  • SSCI-301L “Maps and Spatial Reasoning” Ruddell, MW 2:00-3:20pm

Please feel free to contact Lynn Dodd, Director of the Interdisciplinary Archaeology Major/Minor, at310-210-4081orswartz@usc.eduif you have any questions.

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