Fall 2014 Archaeology courses

Fall 2014 Interdisciplinary Archaeology courses.

The minor requires only five courses, one of which may count towards GE.  See below for minor requirements and course descriptions.

ONE LOWER DIVISION COURSE FROM:

  • AHIS-120g “Foundations of Western Art” Malone, TTh 12:30-1:50pm
  • AHIS-125g “Arts of Asia: Antiquity to 1300″ Sonya, MW 12:00-1:50pm
  • AHIS-128g “Arts of Latin America” Bleichmar, MW 12:00-1:50pm
  • ANTH-200Lg “The Origins of Humanity” MW 2:00-3:20pm
  • ANTH/CLAS-202 “Archaeology: Our Human Past” Garrison, TTh 9:30-10:50am
  • CHEM 105bL “General Chemistry” Bertolini, MWF 11:00-11:50am
  • ENST-100 “Introduction to Environmental Studies” TTh 9:30-10:50am or 2:00-3:20pm
  • MASC-110L “Materials Science” MWF 11:00-11:50am
  • REL-111g “The World of the Hebrew Bible” Zuckerman, MW 2:00-3:20pm
  • REL-112g “Religions of Egypt and the Ancient Near East” Dodd, TTh 11:00-12:20pm or Th 2:00-2:50pm
  • REL-137g “Introduction to Islam” Jackson, TTh 11:00-12:20pm
  • SSCI-265Lg “The Water Planet” Wilson, TTh 11:00-12:20pm

Upper-division Requirements (16 units)

All students shall be required to take at least one Archaeological Theories and Methods course. Beyond this, students may elect to take either:

A: one additional upper-division course from the Theories and Methods list and two upper-division courses from the Interdisciplinary Perspectives list, or

B: one upper-division course from the Interdisciplinary Perspectives list and two upper-division courses from the Interdisciplinary Applications list.

THEORIES AND METHODS COURSES:

  • AHIS/CLAS-415 “Object-Worlds: Histories and Theories of Things” Yasin, T 2:00-4:50pm

INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES COURSES:

  • AHIS/CLAS-321 “Greek Art and Archaeology” Yasin, TTh 11:00-12:30pm
  • ANTH-300 “Evolution, Ecology, and Culture” Boehm, T 2:00-4:50pm
  • ANTH-310 “Archaeology of the Americas” Garrison, TTh 11:00-12:20pm
  • ANTH-314g “The Nature of Maya Civilization” Garrison, TTh 12:30-1:50pm
  • CLAS-349g “Ancient Empires” TBA
  • JS-378 “Jewish Magic in the Ancient World” Garroway, Hochman, TTh 11:00-12:20pm

INTERDISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS COURSES:

  • CHEM 300L “Analytical Chemistry” Devlin, MWF 10:00-10:50am
  • ENST-320a “Water and Soil Sustainability: Energy and Air Sustainability” MW 2:00-3:20pm or TTh 11:00-12:20pm
  • ENST-320b “Water and Soil Sustainability: Energy and Air Sustainability” MW 2:00-3:20pm
  • GEOL-412 “Oceans, Climate, and the Environment” Feakins, TTh 2:00-3:20pm
  • SSCI-301L “Maps and Spatial Reasoning” Ruddell, MW 2:00-3:20pm

Please feel free to contact Lynn Dodd, Director of the Interdisciplinary Archaeology Major/Minor, at310-210-4081orswartz@usc.eduif you have any questions.

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Global Environmental Microbiology (GEM)

CDEBI

The University of Southern California’s Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI), funded by the NSF, offers an all-expense paid four-week intensive introductory course, Global Environmental Microbiology (GEM). This course focuses on microbes found in aquatic environments.

Where: University of Southern California
When: July 7 – August 1, 2014
Who: Undergraduates from 2 or 4-year colleges
Cost: FREE, including travel, plus modest stipend

How to apply: http://www.darkenergybiosphere.org/education/undergrads/undergradscourse.html

Important dates

Application Opens: December 1, 2013
Application Deadline: February 7, 2014
Course: July 7 – August 1, 2014

Note: First generation college, women, and under-represented students encouraged to apply

Additional information:

Cynthia Joseph at cynthijr@usc.edu.

New Course Math for 499 (no math prerequisite)

Math 499 The Foundations of Mathematics and the Acquisition of Mathematical Knowledge Spring 2014

Why is addition commutative but its ‘inverse’ subtraction is not? Why is a equal to a÷b? b

Whyis a ÷c equalto a ×d? Whyisthisstilltrueevenifa,b,canddaren’tintegers? bd bc

What does e + π mean and how can we evaluate it? What is the difference in the meaning of the equals sign between x2 −1 = 0, x2 −1 = (x−1)(x+1), (x2 −1)/(x−1) = x+1 and √x2 = x? What does it mean for a line to be straight? Are there lines that are not straight? In Math 499 we will be addressing these questions and more!

In this class we will explore the foundations of mathematics and how we acquire and process mathematical knowledge. We will revisit K-12 mathematics from the point of view of a mathematician. We will explore the roles of metaphors, models, and definitions. We will discuss the use of symbols and see that even in mathematics their meanings are often contextual. We will compare and contrast proofs and convincing arguments and think about the roles they play in developing and understanding mathematics. We will discuss the relationship between mathematics and our physical world and how we use mathematics to understand the physical world. We will consider various algorithms common in K- 12 mathematics and discuss why and how they work. We also will read and discuss the literature on how K-12 mathematics is taught and how we learn and process that knowledge. Throughout the semester, you will also the opportunity to observe and participate in classes at AUGUSTUS HAWKINS High School. This is a new school with a modern curriculum implementing an initiative called the Algebra Project.

This class has no prerequisites. In particular, it is not necessary to have taken any college level math classes; you are only expected to know how to count (albeit fairly well!). However, students must be willing to engage with the material at a mathematically sophisticated level. There will be very little lecturing. There will be a lot of discussion, group work, and both oral and written presentations. This class will be valuable for math majors, anyone with an interest in teaching mathematics, and sociology and psychology majors interested in the science of learning.

David Crombecque

Lecturer

Mathematics Department

crombecq@usc.edu

Course offering: has a service learning component

relevant majors: mathematics, sciences, psychology, sociology,

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Let’s Get Started: CV Workshop for Juniors & Seniors

SACNAS USC

Tired of trying to translate your research experiences into a CV?  Bring your laptop with your current CV or résumé.  USC SACNAS Chapter will provide best practices and tips, then graduate students and USC staff will help you write it!  This is a working workshop!

Let’s Get Started:  CV Workshop for Juniors & Seniors

November 19, 2013

4:00 – 5:00 pm

THH 102 (Taper Hall)

Please RSVP at:  http://bit.ly/16howD1

SACNAS Careers in Research Workshop Series

Workshops for undergrads interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics

Thinking Ahead:  Could I be a Researcher?

A SACNAS Careers in Research Workshop

October 29, 2013

4:00 – 5:00 pm

THH 102

Sponsored by the USC SACNAS Chapter, this workshop features a panel of USC researchers explaining the importance of research in society and sharing their paths into the sciences.  This is the first of a series of professional development workshops called Careers in Research designed to expose students to research.

SACNAS, the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science, is an inclusive organization for all people and all disciplines dedicated to promoting academic excellence and mentoring students to advanced degrees in STEM fields. http://sacnas.org/   The goal of the USC SACNAS Chapter is to create a community at USC for all students in all disciplines interested in research.

Students can register at this link:

https://usccollege.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0fBx5mv0v7bs10w

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Schlumberger Careers Information Session

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Schlumberger is looking for individuals who seek challenges, are self motivated, and have a high energy level to apply for the Petrotechnical positions. These positions are demanding jobs involving state of the art technology to optimize solutions for Exploration and Production companies. Our petrotechnical experts – Geoscientists, Petroleum Engineers, IT Specialists, Mathematicians, & Physicists – play a vital role in our success.

Info Session: Monday, October 28, 2013

Time: 6:00-8:00pm Location: SGM 101

We invite you to meet with us for an inside look to the upcoming available Petrotechnical Positions. You will have an opportunity to talk one on one with Schlumberger representatives and learn more about who we are and what we do as an Oilfield Servicing Company. Food and Beverages will be provided!

To apply, view testimonials, or additional information, visit our website:

careers.slb.com

Fall 2013 Career Fair

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The Fall 2013 Career Fair is here!  Each year, more than 400 organizations seeking to employ USC students from diverse disciplines attend our career fairs. All students are encouraged to attend and explore the wide variety of internship and full-time employment opportunities that are represented:

Thursday, September 19, 2013
10:00 am – 2:30 pm

Trousdale Parkway

Part-time, Full-Time, and Internship positions available from over 150 companies.  Log-in to connect SC for more information.

Dress to impress!  Bring your resume.

careers.usc.edu

Explore@4

Explore@4 is a series of interactive panel discussions designed to help students explore popular career paths with industry professions in an informational setting.

All Explore@4 panels take place from 4:00 – 5:30 PM (w/exception)

Fall 2013  Career Panels:

9.9 Careers in technology for Non-Techies @ Trojan Presentation Room – STU B3

9.10 Language Careers @ Trojan Presentation Room – STU B3

9.11 TIS Bulge Bracket Investment Banking Panel – @ Davidson Conference Center (7:00 – 9:00pm)

9.12 Economics and Math Careers @ Tutor Campus Center 351/352

9.24 Health Careers without an MD @ Tutor Campus Center 227

9.25 Careers for Foodies @ Trojan Presentation Room – STU B3

9.26 Consulting @ Tutor Campus Center 351/352

For more information: careers.usc.edu

Counselors Wanted for the Catalina Summer High School Marine Lab

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The Invisible Men Screening

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The Campus Conversation Series: USC Women Who Have Served

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Grace Ford Salvatori Community Service Tuition Scholarships

The Salvatori Community Scholars program provides support to advanced graduate students who are doing community-based research whose experiences with community-based organizations can lead to new opportunities for service-learning students at USC.

Scholar(s) work with JEP’s Associate Director for Research and Academic Affairs, USC faculty, and one or more community organizations to develop service-learning projects for undergraduate USC students. Projects are to be jointly determined by the needs of the community, the academic goals of the service-learning course, and the abilities and interests of the Scholar, and might include participatory action research or direct service activities. All projects must involve undergraduate students in work that builds their knowledge and skills while supporting the Scholar in a community-centered project. Ideally, the service-learning project will closely correspond to the scholarly activities of the Salvatori Community Scholar.

Check out the link for more information and how to apply! http://dornsife.usc.edu/salvatori-community-scholars