ElevatED: STEM Pre-Teaching Society

ElevatED> 69% of high school graduates are not ready for college-level science and 54% for math
> The U.S. is ranked 23rd in science and 31st in math on international exams
> Females and minorities are under-represented in STEM fields

To turn this situation around, the U.S. needs to ensure that we have a high-impact teacher in every classroom. That is why we are forming a national STEM Pre-Teaching Society and seeking USC students who want to found their campus’ chapter.

To learn more about founding the pre-teaching society, RSVP for our info session on March 4 (6-7pm) and/or read this overview document which covers:

* Why a STEM pre-teaching society
* The mission and purpose of the group
* The resources & support provided to chapter founders

If you have any questions or would like to request more information, you can use this form or email founding president Manny Soriano directly (mssorian@usc.edu)

As a founder of the ElevatED Pre-Teaching Society at USC, you will not only leave a legacy on campus, but also encourage the next generation of math/science teachers. We will organize seminars and internships in teaching. We plan to host a STEM enrichment after-school program for middle schoolers over spring break and we will organize a STEM enrichment day at Columbia during spring semester.

Just like a pre-law or pre-med society serves as a community of students interested in those professions and supports them to explore the profession, ElevatED enables students to explore the teaching profession to determine how they can be involved in improving STEM education and ending educational inequity.

Students at Stanford, NYU, and Columbia are forming like-minded student groups, and ElevatED is spreading to the top 100 universities.

Email Manny Soriano (mssorian@usc.edu)

Dornsife Degrees Get Jobs! Learn From Successful Alumni

Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Time: 4:00pm-5:00pm
Location: Trojan Presentation Room (TPR), Student Union B3 (basement)

Are you trying to figure out your career choices after college? Ever wonder what you can do with your undergraduate degree?

A student’s major does not dictate their career options or possibilities. The Dornsife Advising Office will be hosting a panel of Dornsife Alumni who graduated from the college with one major and are now successfully employed in a different field. The panel will consist of alumni from a range of majors including Spanish, Economics, Psychology, Political Science, and Art History who are now working in areas such as sales, research, business, law, and management. Learn about their experiences as undergraduates and how they were able to able to make the most of their time at USC.  Discover the importance of transferable skills and how they contribute to your success when searching for a job and internship.

ZYGO Series – QUARANTINE: Balancing Human Rights with Medical Best Interests

ZYGO Series—QUARANTINE: Balancing Human Rights with Medical Best Interests
Friday, January 23, 2014, Doheny Memorial Library 241 | 12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch Provided
RSVP:  http://bit.ly/1Cf8IxO
More Information: http://dornsife.usc.edu/zygo-series

The first known usage of quarantine dates back from 1377 in the city of Dubrovnik, Croatia when ships suspected of carrying the Black Plague were subjected to a 40 day hold before being allowed to enter the port. Quarantine is distinct from isolation in that it is solely a preventive measure enacted to seclude individuals who may be at risk of spreading a certain disease.

Although quarantine has not been frequently implemented in recent history, during the recent outbreak of Ebola, entire villages in Liberia were subjected to quarantines, and in the US, multiple states implemented mandatory quarantines for health care workers returning from West Africa. These quarantine policies were heavily criticized by many as violating basic human rights and simply being unnecessary. Panelists for this forum will consider the medical relevance and necessity of quarantine and the human rights concerns associated with it.

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Sofia Gruskin, J.D., MIA, Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine and Gould School of Law, and Director, Program on Global Health & Human Rights, Keck School of Medicine
Alison Dundes Renteln, Professor of Political Science, Anthropology, and Policy, Planning, and Development, USC Dornsife
Paul Holtom, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Orthopedics and Program Director, Infectious Disease Fellowship Program, Keck School of Medicine
Abelard Podgorski, Ph.D. Student, Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Jacob Roberts, Undergraduate Student, Economics and East Asian Languages and Cultures, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

Problems without Passports in Dakar, Senegal

Dakar, Senegal awaits! Culture, cuisine, history, nightlife, and beaches…experience all of these while learning about and researching Senegal’s rich literary traditions and contemporary literati.

This Problems without Passports class, French 499, invites any and all students with a good knowledge of French (intermediate recommended) to apply for this unique course. After one week at USC, we will travel to Dakar, Senegal to spend three weeks with writers, publishers, artists, Senegalese university students, and the like. USC students in anthropology, comparative literature, history, global studies, IR, narrative studies, global health, ASE, sociology, and of course, French, would all gain from this opportunity. For example, if you’re interested in history, your research could focus on writers whose works rewrite and reimagine postcolonial history. Global health? Choose a novel that treats disability and/or disease in Senegal.

INFO SESSION to be held Tuesday, January 27, 3 – 4:30pm in Taper 120.

Refreshments served!

Volunteer with USC Caruso Catholic Center

Are you interested in giving back to the USC community? Are you looking for a flexible volunteer opportunity that looks great on your resume? The USC Caruso Catholic Center is currently in need of tutors for the Spring semester in all subjects! Whether it’s English, Math, Choir, or Sports we are accepting tutors during school hours and after school hours. If you are interested please contact: sasha@catholictrojan.org.

ZYGO Series—DOCTORS VS. PARENTS: Decision-making in Pediatrics

Friday, November 21, 2014, Doheny Memorial Library 241 | 12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch Provided
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1xqn0bu
More Information: http://dornsife.usc.edu/zygo-series

Making decisions for children in a medical context can be extremely stressful and complex. In some notable pediatric cases, parents have made decisions that go against the recommendations of doctors. Such cases have included denying treatment for cancer or refusing to allow their children to receive vaccinations. Furthermore, in the case that a child appears to be suffering from serious abuse or neglect, medical centers are now able to forcibly provide care by implementing Child Protective Services (CPS). However, this service has often been criticized for being used incorrectly and simply as a means for health care providers to avoid liabilities.

Panelists for this seminar will discuss how parents and doctors can best make decisions concerning the treatment children should receive. They will also consider how CPS can most appropriately be implemented in a medical setting, and if treatment should be forced if deemed medically necessary.

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Janet Schneiderman
, Research Associate Professor, USC Social Work
Kenneth Geller, MD, Director of Dornsife Pre-Health Advisement, Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, USC Keck
Ankit Shah, MD, JD, Assistant Professor, USC Keck, Lecturer in Law, USC Gould, Attending Physician, LAC+USC Medical Center
Rima Basu, Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

Ask @DeanSteveKay About #Koolscience


USC Dornsife Dean Steve Kay invites you to ask him questions about his research and scientific expertise on Twitter at @DeanSteveKay (http://twitter.com/DeanSteveKay) using the hashtag #Koolscience. Kay regularly uses this hashtag to call out interesting scientific news on Twitter.

One of the top experts on genes and circadian rhythms, Dr. Kay’s research is contributing to the development of new drugs that treat metabolic disorders such as Type 2 diabetes as well as to understanding how plants can better adapt to climate change. And he was recently named by Thomson Reuters as one of “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds.”

Dr. Kay welcomes questions on everything from food security and GMOs to the best time of day to make a big decision. Below are links to more information about his laboratory and research as well as links to media outlets in which he has offered expert commentary.

Submit your questions on Twitter by Friday, November 7 and follow @DeanSteveKay (http://twitter.com/DeanSteveKay) to find out the answers to your questions on Nov. 12-14, 2014.

For those who are not on Twitter, you may submit your question online: https://jfe.qualtrics.com/form/SV_eh3ZQsVEPLlNmpT.

More details at http://dornsife.usc.edu/koolscience/