Dornsife Degrees Get Jobs! Learn From Successful Alumni

Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Time: 4:00pm-5:00pm
Location: Trojan Presentation Room (TPR), Student Union B3 (basement)

Are you trying to figure out your career choices after college? Ever wonder what you can do with your undergraduate degree?

A student’s major does not dictate their career options or possibilities. The Dornsife Advising Office will be hosting a panel of Dornsife Alumni who graduated from the college with one major and are now successfully employed in a different field. The panel will consist of alumni from a range of majors including Spanish, Economics, Psychology, Political Science, and Art History who are now working in areas such as sales, research, business, law, and management. Learn about their experiences as undergraduates and how they were able to able to make the most of their time at USC.  Discover the importance of transferable skills and how they contribute to your success when searching for a job and internship.

Open positions with USC Archaeology

OFFICE ASSISTANT
USC Archaeology is seeking an office assistant with federal work-study funding to assist in the Archaeology Research Center in Ahmanson Center on campus for 8 to 12 hours per week during the Spring 2015 semester in support of the Archaeology Major/Minor!

Responsibilities will include but will not be limited to clerical work (filing, scanning, etc.), greeting and directing visitors, helping at events, supporting PR and calendar posting of events, online mailing list updates, and tasks related to administration of Archaeology major/minor.

Qualifications:

  • Undergraduate student at USC
  • Experience using Microsoft Office
  • Willingness to learn basic Photoshop image editing techniques
  • Ability to work independently
  • Work-study eligibility

Interested applicants who have work-study should contact Lynn Dodd (archaeology@usc.edu)


SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER
USC Archaeology is seeking a social media manager to help build an online community around USC Archaeology. Flexible hours between 5 to 12 hours per week starting in February, 2015. Responsibilities will include, but will not be limited to, assisting in the development, curation and presentation of online content through Facebook, websites, Instagram, Twitter feed, and similar online social media channels; online event promotion; supporting PR and calendar posting of events, courses, profiles; supporting mailing list updates and administration of social media for USC Archaeology, the Archaeology Research Center and the Interdisciplinary Archaeology major/minor.

Qualifications:

  • Undergraduate student at USC
  • Experience using social media channels including legitimate online community cultivation
  • Willingness to learn basic Photoshop image editing techniques
  • Ability to work independently

Interested applicants should contact Lynn Dodd (archaeology@usc.edu)

 

Course Offering: AHIS 325 4 Units): “Roman Archaeological Excavation: Methods & Practice”

USC Summer Archaeological Excavation at Ostia Antica, the Port of Ancient Rome (June 8 to July 19, 2015)
AHIS 325 (4 Units): “Roman Arachaeological Excavation: Methods & Practice”

6 week program: 1 week of walking tours of Rome & Ostia, 5 weeks of excavating at Ostia

(Students housed in apartments in the center of Rome)

No prerequisites or previous archaeological experience necessary: All instruction in English

For a report on the excavation, see USC Daily Trojan Online: http://dailytrojan.com/2014/08/28/professor-leads-archaeology-expedition/

For those interested in participating, please email Dr. John Pollini, Professor of Classical Art, Archaeology, & History
Department of Art History, USC : pollini@usc.edu
Deadline for Housing Deposit: On or before Sun., March 1, 2015

Problems without Passports in Dakar, Senegal

Dakar, Senegal awaits! Culture, cuisine, history, nightlife, and beaches…experience all of these while learning about and researching Senegal’s rich literary traditions and contemporary literati.

This Problems without Passports class, French 499, invites any and all students with a good knowledge of French (intermediate recommended) to apply for this unique course. After one week at USC, we will travel to Dakar, Senegal to spend three weeks with writers, publishers, artists, Senegalese university students, and the like. USC students in anthropology, comparative literature, history, global studies, IR, narrative studies, global health, ASE, sociology, and of course, French, would all gain from this opportunity. For example, if you’re interested in history, your research could focus on writers whose works rewrite and reimagine postcolonial history. Global health? Choose a novel that treats disability and/or disease in Senegal.

INFO SESSION to be held Tuesday, January 27, 3 – 4:30pm in Taper 120.

Refreshments served!


USC Summer Archaeological Excavation at Ostia Antica, the Port of Ancient Rome (June 8 to July 19, 2015)

AHIS 325 (4 Units):
“Roman Archaeological Excavation: Methods & Practice”

6 week program: 1 week of walking tours of Rome & Ostia, 5 weeks of excavating at Ostia

(Students housed in apartments in the center of Rome)

No prerequisites or previous archaeological experience necessary:
All instruction in English

For a report on the excavation, see USC Daily Trojan Online:

http://dailytrojan.com/2014/08/28/professor-leads-archaeology-expedition/

For those interested in participating, please email Dr. John Pollini, Professor of Classical Art, Archaeology, & History
Department of Art History, USC: pollini@usc.edu

Deadline for Housing Deposit: On or before Sun., March 1, 2015

Break into Research!

The Undergraduate Research Consortium (URC) is a group of undergraduate researchers that helps students get involved in research. In Break into Research, we help students find research opportunities in small groups. All majors are welcome!

Thursday, October 30, 2014
6:30-7:30 p.m.
THH 208

 

Ice Age Discoveries Deep Beneath the Yucatan

Ice Age Discoveries Deep Beneath the Yucatan
Underwater ancient caves. Early humans in America.

Dominique Rissolo
Waitt Foundation and University of California, San Diego

A young woman’s skeleton has been discovered deep beneath the Yucatan. It is the oldest, most complete yet found in the Americas.

Underwater cave systems of the Yucatan Peninsula are a promising frontier for finding and understanding early people in America. Since the last glacial maximum, a maze of passageways beneath the Yucatan has flooded. Rising sea levels have covered remains of animals and humans dating to the Late Pleistocene.

A new picture is emerging from osteological and taphonomic analyses; absolute dating of human, faunal, macrobotanical, and geological samples; human DNA analyses; and hydrogeology and sedimentology and multi-proxy paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Innovate recording and imaging techniques are enabling researchers to analyze archaeological remains with minimal impact to the site and the remains.

Thursday Oct 23rd 4 pm
USC ACB 238
Refreshments
Sponsored by USC Archaeology