Spring 2015 AMST Classes

AMST 101gm: Race and Class in Los Angeles
Tues/Thurs 11am – 12:20 pm | THH 201
Class no. 10310R | 4 units
Taught by Professor Manuel Pastor

Los Angeles has always had an underbelly that belies this hope of inclusive opportunity and shared prosperity: the chance of reinvention has always been accompanied by sharp residential segregation, significant economic deprivation, and an uneasy relationship with the natural setting that attracted so many in the first place. Contradictions seem to abound: celebrated for its cultural openness and it multiethnic fusion of identities, it is also known as a place that both perfected a modernized form of residential segregation and experienced two major waves of civil unrest (the Watts riots of 1965 and Los Angeles uprising of 1992). Considered the capital of working poverty in the United States, it is also host to a revitalized labor movement. And while L.A. has been the epicenter of immigration to the United States – in the 1980s, it was receiving one quarter of the nation’s immigrants – it has also been a focal point for anti-immigrant sentiment and action.

AMST 200m: Introduction to American Studies and Ethnicity
Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:50 am | THH 215
Class no. 10347 | 4 units
Taught by Professor Alicia Chavez

This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to American and Ethnic Studies. A principal goal is to help students understand how people in the United States live in and think about their country as well as how the world views them. The central themes and topics addressed will include identity formation, immigration, imprisonment, militarism, cultural production, religion, sexuality, and political change. This course will encourage students to formulate connections between these issues by placing them in their broad historical and cultural contexts. We will consider a variety of types of evidence such as novels, photographs, films, the built environment, and material culture to show that we can and need to analyze everything in the world around us.

*In addition to meeting the University Diversity Requirement, this course meets the requirements for all ASE Majors and Minors!

AMST 250: The African Disapora
Tues/Thurs 12:30-1:50 PM | SGM 101
Class no. 10381R

As laborers, creators, culture bearers, political activists, dreamers, and renegades, African Americans were the fulcrum upon which the country’s material and cultural wealth was built. Throughout the last two centuries, black social movements occasionally pricked America’s moral conscience and compelled the nation to re-think the meaning of democracy. The core of much of “American” culture and politics has been shaped immeasurably by black social movements, which in turn have opened a path for the demands of other aggrieved populations.

In this course, we examine historical and contemporary black movements for freedom, justice, equality, autonomy and self-determination. Beginning with the struggles of Africans to destroy or escape from the system of slavery, we consider a wide range of movements, including labor, civil rights, radical feminism, socialism and communism, reparations, Black Nationalism, and hip hop as a political movement. We will explore, among other things, how movements were formed and sustained; the social and historical contexts for their emergence and demise; and the impact they might have had on power.

*Courses fulfills these requirements: Diversity Requirement; ASAF social and political issues; elective: ASE, ASCL, ASAS majors; and ASE minor elective.

AMST 247gm: Exploring Ethnicity through Film
Tues/Thurs 11-12:20 pm | THH 301
Class no. 10390RTaught by Proessor Kara Keeling

This course explores the complexities of race/ethnicity in America through analyses of films. We shall ask such questions as: What is ethnicity? How is ethnicity shaped, or how does one “become” ethnic?, What is at stake in claims and visual representations about ethnicity; what politics surround ethnic representations and performances?, How is ethnicity actualized and/or performed?, Can there be an “authentic” ethnicity?, and, finally, How are such complexities reflected and/or constructed in film? Towards these ends, the initial weeks of the semester will be devoted to developing a critical vocabulary for speaking about race/ethnicity. We will also (continuously) hone our visual literacy by looking at the ways notions of ethnicity are privileged, constructed, and contested in film via such techniques as editing, sound, lighting, narration, etc. This middle of the course will focus on case studies in film that illuminate the complexities of ethnicity in relation to specific American ethnic groups. The latter weeks of the course will explore broader complexities of ethnicity, such as ethnic hybridity and inter-ethnic relations encompassing political conflict, interracial love and identity, and residential strife.

*Course fulfills these requirements: Diversity requirement; ASAF Social and Political Issues; Elective: ASE, ASCL, ASAS Majors; Elective: ASE Minor

AMST 301: America, the Frontier, and the New West
Mon/Wed 12-1:50 PM | SGM 123
Class no. 10408R
Taught by Prof. Thomas Gustafson

This course is an introduction to an interdisciplinary study of American political, cultural and social life with a particular emphasis on the Western United States as a region. We will examine the diversity of peoples and experiences in the U.S. West over time, paying particular attention to how the foundational beliefs of American civilization have been played out in historical reality in the past and present. Topics will include the experiences of racial and ethnic conflict and cooperation; economic development of the region; tourism and the representations of “America” in Las Vegas, Hawaii, California, and other Western sites; meanings of frontier societies and their effect on incorporation into the broader United States; the birth of new movements for American civil rights in the region; and contemporary and historical struggles over who is “native” and who is “foreign” in the region that has become known as the “New West.”

AMST 337: Islam in Black America: From Slavery to Hip Hop
Tues/Thurs 12:30-1:50 pm | VKC 210
Class no. 10417R
Taught by Professor Sherman Jackson

Is there such a thing as “Black American Islam?” Can there be? Should there be? What would distinguish it from historical Islam, and how will/should it relate to the global Muslim community? How do Black American Muslims relate to those Muslims who came to America from the Muslim world? What about Black American Muslim women? And how has 9-11 affected all of these relationships? As for Hip Hop, what role have/do Muslims play[ed] in its development and substance, and what challenges or opportunities does Hip Hop pose for Black American and other Muslims? Finally, what does all of this tell us about the future of Islam in Black America?

AMST 342m: Law and Identities
Mon/Wed 10-11:50 am | WPH 206
Class no. 10421
Taught by Alicia Chavez

This seminar is designed to allow students to explore the complex and contested interactions between the law and the construction of group and individual identities. Students will study theories of identity and community including racial, gender, religious, national, and sexual and will focus upon how the law has been central in defining, rewarding, and punishing difference. After a general examination of how diverse communities define themselves and their legal and contemporary problems, the class will examine cases studies.

AMST 350: American Studies & Ethnicity Junior Seminar
Mon/Wed 10-11:50 am | KAP 166
Class no. 10424R
Taught by Professor Lanita Jacobs

This seminar will provide a broad overview of social research methods pertinent to the study of race, ethnicity, gender, and culture. In the first half of the course, attention will be devoted to qualitative and quantitative methods, including oral history interviews, ethnographic observation/field research, and surveys. We will also explore theories concerning “ethnicity” as both a social construct and constituent feature of peoples’ identities and lived experiences. In the second half of the course, we will examine the application of social research methods and theories in scholarship pertinent to American Studies.

*This course is a core requirement for all ASE Majors and Minors

AMST 357m: Latino Social Movements
Tues 2-4:50 pm | THH 108
Class no. 10427
Taught by Prof. Juan De Lara

Focuses on the political experience of Latinos in the U.S. Comparative analysis of their political experiences and perspectives, their histories of identity formation, and their political organizations.

*This course fulfills the diversity requirement. It also fulfills the requirements for the majors in American Studies and Ethnicity and the Chicano/Latino Studies as well as the minors in American Studies and Ethnicity and the American Popular Culture.

AMST 365: Leadership in the Community – Internship
Wed 2-4:50 pm | VKC 257
Class no. 10426
Taught by Prof. Stanley Huey

Community leadership is fundamentally about empowerment, that is, empowering others to develop the skills, strategies and the confidence to solve their own problems. Study leadership within the context of a community-based organization through a hands-on internship experience. Explore theory and research on leadership, as well as principles of behavioral and social change, using specific examples from your own community leadership efforts.

  • In the past, students have been placed with organizaons such as ACORN, A Place Called Home, the Boys & Girls Club, the Korean Immigrant Workers Association (KIWA), Planned Parenthood, and the Salvation Army.” Then follow that with “Students are encouraged to choose their own internship with instructor approval. Those who are already doing an internship should approach the instructor to find out if it qualifies.
  • USC Students at all levels (including Freshmen), and from all disciplines, are encouraged to enroll.
  • Students who are already doing an internship can approach the Instructor about the possibility of getting course credit.

*This course fulfills requirements for all ASE Majors and Minors, including Popular Culture, Leadership, and Race & Politics Minors.

AMST 373: History of the Mexican American
Mon/Wed 2-3:20 PM | THH 213Class no. 10428R
Taught by Professor Alicia Chavez

This course is an exploration of the history and culture of Mexican Americans and other Latinos in the United States from the colonial era to the present. We will examine the diversity of experiences among this group across the United States, paying particular attention to issues of race, region, gender, class, and immigrant status. Topics will include the varied experiences of colonialism and immigration; the role of race prejudice and discrimination in shaping social mobility; cultural transformation and regional variations in language, religion and music; gender as a central variable in defining issues of identity and opportunity; and the birth of a Chicano/Latino civil rights movement.

*AMST/HIST 373 fulfills the history requirement in both Chicano/Latino Studies & American Studies majors. It also fulfills requirements in the History major. It also fulfills elective requirements in African American Studies and Asian American Studies. This course is open to all students with an interest in the topic.

AMST 378: Introduction to Asian American Histoy
Tues/Thurs 11-12:20 pm | WPH 103
Class no. 10430
Taught by Lon Y. Kurashige

This class is designed to be an exciting and challenging introduction to the field of Asian American Studies. Asian American Studies was born out of the 1960s movements for social justice and equality. Thus, fundamental to this class is the concept of race and racial dynamics in the United States. Regardless of their racial identity, students will be challenged to examine how social identities have influenced their life and society overall. The main objectives of this course are 1) to gain an overview, from a range of perspectives, of Asian American history, community, and contemporary issues; and 2) to analyze critically important social structures in the U.S. and elsewhere.

*This class meets USC’s diversity requirement by addressing the formation of race relations in relationship to social class and gender distinctions within American society and Asian immigrant communities. Issues of diversity and nation are addressed in substantial discussion of US imperialism and through foreign relations and wars.

AMST 449: Asian American Literature
Tues/Thurs 12:30-1:50 pm | THH 108
Class no. 10438R
Taught by Prof. Viet Nguyen

This course is a selective examination of the major works, authors, and themes of Asian American literature, from the mid-20th century until the contemporary moment. The primary concern of the course is to demonstrate the dynamic relationship between Asian American literature and the histories of Asians in the United States, and the United States in Asia. In particular, the shifting function of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans in U.S. culture and economy will be a focus for the course as we examine how Asian American literary concerns and styles have evolved with that shifting function. Ultimately, the proposition this course puts forth is that the aesthetics of Asian American literature is inseparable from the politics of Asian American experiences; this intersection between aesthetics and politics is one important site where Asian American culture and identity are formed.

AMST 498: Senior Seminar in American Studies and Ethnicity
Mon 2-4:50 | VKC 105
Course no. 10444R
Taught by Prof. Laura Pulido

This course investigates contemporary American culture through the lens of the literary, visual, and performing arts. The course proposes 1) that the arts play a vital role in shaping American thought and sentiment, 2) that the arts provide a means to address national issues and debates, and 3) that the study of the arts enhances our understanding of the contemporary scene. The course is organized around three clusters—“Now,”“Peace,” “AIDS,”—each with its own set of readings.

AMST 493: Senior Honors Thesis in American Studies & Ethnicity
Tues 2-4:50 pm | KAP 150
Course no. 10443
Taught by Prof. Sarah Gualtieri

The American Studies and Ethnicity Department at the University of Southern California offers a two-semester honors program for qualified students, first identified in ASE 350 or by the program advisor. Students spend their first semester in the honors program in an honors senior seminar, ASE 492, focused on developing their research and methods for the honors thesis. During the second semester, all honors students are required to take ASE 493, in which each completes a thesis project on a topic of his or her own choosing under faculty direction. Contact the program advisor for further information.

ZYGO Series—DOCTORS VS. PARENTS: Decision-making in Pediatrics

Friday, November 21, 2014, Doheny Memorial Library 241 | 12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch Provided
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1xqn0bu
More Information: http://dornsife.usc.edu/zygo-series

Making decisions for children in a medical context can be extremely stressful and complex. In some notable pediatric cases, parents have made decisions that go against the recommendations of doctors. Such cases have included denying treatment for cancer or refusing to allow their children to receive vaccinations. Furthermore, in the case that a child appears to be suffering from serious abuse or neglect, medical centers are now able to forcibly provide care by implementing Child Protective Services (CPS). However, this service has often been criticized for being used incorrectly and simply as a means for health care providers to avoid liabilities.

Panelists for this seminar will discuss how parents and doctors can best make decisions concerning the treatment children should receive. They will also consider how CPS can most appropriately be implemented in a medical setting, and if treatment should be forced if deemed medically necessary.

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Panelists:
Janet Schneiderman
, Research Associate Professor, USC Social Work
Kenneth Geller, MD, Director of Dornsife Pre-Health Advisement, Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, USC Keck
Ankit Shah, MD, JD, Assistant Professor, USC Keck, Lecturer in Law, USC Gould, Attending Physician, LAC+USC Medical Center
Rima Basu, Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL ETHICS BOWL 2014

Saturday, December 6, 2014 | USC University Park Campus 

The Levan Institute is​ looking for student volunteers and faculty moderators for the Southern California High School Ethics Bowl. The event will be held on USC’s University Park Campus. If interested, please contact Janet Kramer at usclevan@dornsife.usc.edu.

Learn More: http://dornsife.usc.edu/high-school-ethics-bowl
Hosted by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics​

Film Screening: “Northern Light” Levan Institute Cinema of Substance Series

Tuesday, November 11, 2014, The Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108 | 7 PM 

RSVP:  http://bit.ly/1EhYFpv  ​

Winner, Most Innovative Feature, 2013 Visions Du Réel, Switzerland
Winner, Best Cinematography, 2013 New Orleans Film Festival, Louisiana

Set against the backdrop of a town’s annual snowmobile race, Northern Light interweaves captivating stories of recession-era America. The lives of three families change profoundly in the north woods of Michigan, where winters are unforgiving, jobs are hard to come by, and the line between living life and merely surviving is razor-thin.

“Cool in tone and temperature, Nick Bentgen’s Northern Light turns white vistas and blue language into a sneakily compelling, endlessly patient observation of three working-class families in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.”

—Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

The Cinema of Substance Series showcases meaningful films from around the world that explore who we are and how we might be.

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the School of Cinematic Arts

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS: LEVAN-OXFORD SPRING 2015 WORKSHOP

Human Rights In and After Conflict | March 21 - March 27, 2015 | Oxford, UK

The Levan Institute partners with the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict annually to offer a workshop at the University of Oxford. Areas of study include human rights in and after conflict, humanitarian action, conflict trends, human rights law, and peacemaking with a focus on recent armed conflicts. The module is a healthy mix of seminars, working groups, and student presentations.

From Marissa Roy, Dornsife Philosophy, Politics and Law ’14 and Annenberg MA Public Diplomacy ’14
“I gained a much clearer idea of what humanitarian work looks like in the field and what challenges humanitarian workers face. I hope that, as a law student with political aspirations, this perspective will help me craft policies that keep in mind the realities of the field.”

More Information and To Apply: http://dornsife.usc.edu/levan-oxford-workshops
Deadline to Apply: Monday, December 1, 2014

Photos from the Levan-Oxford Spring 2014 Workshop: http://bit.ly/10N4nmv

Read about the Spring 2014 Levan-Oxford Workshop in USC Dornsife News “Humanitarian Spring”: http://bit.ly/118Vx3i​

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics—IS IT TIME TO ABOLISH THE DEATH PENALTY?

Wednesday, November 12, 2014, Ground Zero Cafe | Noon | Lunch Provided

RSVP:  http://bit.ly/1yn5wfr 

Recent reports of botched executions by lethal injection have reignited debate over the moral and legal defensibility of the death penalty.  As new DNA technologies lead to exoneration of increasing numbers of the condemned, discoveries in brain science alter our views of criminal responsibility, concern over discriminatory application increases, and execution methods are successively deemed unconstitutionally cruel, should the United States finally lay the death penalty to rest?

Program Director and Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Panelists:
Michael Brennan, Clinical Professor of Law, USC Gould
Martin Levine, USC Vice Provost and Senior Advisor to the Provost
Dan Simon, Richard L. and Maria B. Crutcher Professor of Law and Psychology, USC Gould
Varun Soni, USC Dean of Religious Life
Ralph Wedgwood, Professor of Philosophy, USC Dornsife​

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics encourage faculty, staff, and students from every part of our USC community to talk about the ethical questions of the day.

Minority Health Conference Invitation

Minority Health Conference:
Real Life Solutions to a Better Los Angeles
Saturday, November 15, 2014

You’re invited to this year’s 13th Annual Minority Health Conference organized by the Keck School of Medicine of USC, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and the Charles Drew University of Medicine & Science.

The conference aims to address minority health disparities and to raise awareness about minority health issues in Southern California and beyond. This year’s conference focuses on building health communities and finding tangible solutions to issues highlighted by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH).

Opening Keynote:
Paul Simon, M.D., MPH,
Director, Division of Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

Featuring:
- Pre-health workshop with Deans of Admission from USC, UCLA, Western U Medical Schools, and Executive Staff from USC OT program- Residents forum
- Domestic Violence Training
- Mental Health in the Latino Community
- Breakfast and lunch will be provided

Register Today: http://www.minorityhealthconference.org
University of Southern California, Health Sciences Campus1975 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089