Civil Rights as Human Rights – A USC Levan Institute-Oxford Workshop

CIVIL RIGHTS AS HUMAN RIGHTS
A USC LEVAN INSTITUTE-OXFORD WORKSHOP
JULY 5-12, 2015 | LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS

In partnership with the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict and the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, this workshop gives participating students the opportunity to think through the relationship between civil rights, usually considered primary for local politics and social organization, and human rights, typically understood in international frameworks. In particular, and as a means of concretely developing this relationship, we will focus our study on civil rights in the United States with regard to race, racism, and structural oppression.

Students will participate in a number of seminar sessions with leading civil rights, human rights, and legal scholars in addition to visiting a number of historical monuments dedicated to the struggle for civil rights in the Southern United States. Participating students will further have the opportunity to meet with and discuss local organizing with community stakeholders in the greater Little Rock area in an effort to enable the application of insights learned in the seminar context to community building projects. Site visits include Little Rock Central High School, the home of Daisy Bates, and the US National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, TN.

Curriculum Overview:
Human Rights v. Civil Rights; US Jurisprudence and the Civil Rights – Human Rights Distinction; Legal Issues in the US Civil Rights Struggle; Role of the Church in US Civil Rights; Activism and Contemporary Struggles; Structural Racism; and Cultivating Reconciliation and Community Conversations.

Visit www.dornsife.usc.edu/levan for application information. Application Deadline: March 23, 2015

Spirit of the Law

SPIRIT OF THE LAW
Hon. Dorothy Wright Nelson, U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit
March 12, 2015 | 12:30 PM-1:20 PM
USC Gould School of Law, Room 103 | Lunch Provided
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1DMCj2u​

The Honorable Dorothy Wright Nelson is currently a senior judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, a U.S. federal court covering the nine western states. Nelson began her professional career as a research associate at the University of Southern California Law School where she received her Master of Laws in 1956. Nelson became Dean of the University of Southern California Law School in 1969 and holds the honor of being the first woman dean of a major American law school. Nelson is a member of the Baha’i Faith and served on its National Assembly for 40 years. While at USC, she served as the Baha’i representative on the University Religious Council.

President Carter nominated Nelson for the position of judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in 1978, with the U.S. Senate confirming her in 1979. She has worked to popularize mediation in U.S. Courts and in such countries as India, Egypt, Israel, Great Britain, and China. In 1985, Nelson, along with a group of attorneys and judges, established the Western Justice Center Foundation. The Foundation has created numerous programs that are designed to teach peaceful conflict resolution to children, youth, parents, teachers, administrators and community members. Nelson holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and a J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

The Spirit of the Law Series features legal professionals discussing how they find meaning, purpose, and identity in the law; how they use their law degrees in creative and innovative ways; and how they connect the personal and the professional in their lives.

Organizing Sponsors: USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and USC Office of Religious Life
Cosponsors: USC Dornsife Pre-Law Advising and USC Jewish Law Students Association

USC LEVAN INSTITUTE FOR HUMANITIES AND ETHICS
The USC Levan Institute engages students with the timeless values at the core of our humanity, promotes moral reflection and understanding of self, facilitates multidisciplinary dialogue, and encourages students to make a positive impact across society and the globe.

University of Southern California
Contact: Dr. Lyn Boyd-Judson, Director
usclevan@dornsife.usc.edu

UNEQUAL JUSTICE: When Police Kill

UNEQUAL JUSTICE: When Police Kill
A Levan Coffeehouse Conversation on Practical Ethics
March 11, 2015 | Noon | Ground Zero Cafe (TRO) | Lunch Provided
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1KOrO0F

Recent police killings of unarmed black males in Ferguson, New York City and Cleveland have reignited the debate over racial profiling and police treatment of minorities, prompting calls for use of body cameras on police, demilitarization of police forces and expanded community policing. How should we weigh police protection, public safety and civil liberties?

Coffeehouse Conversations Program Director and Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Panelists:
Ange-Marie Hancock, Associate Professor of Political Science and Gender Studies, USC Dornsife
Martin Levine, USC Vice Provost and Senior Advisor to the Provost
Jody Armour, Roy P. Crocker Professor of Law, USC Gould School of Law
Rob Saltzman, Professor of Lawyering Skills, USC Gould School of Law

­­­­Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics encourage faculty, staff, and students from every part of our USC community to talk about the ethical questions of the day.

USC LEVAN INSTITUTE FOR HUMANITIES AND ETHICS
The USC Levan Institute engages students with the timeless values at the core of our humanity, promotes moral reflection and understanding of self, facilitates multidisciplinary dialogue, and encourages students to make a positive impact across society and the globe.

University of Southern California
Contact: Dr. Lyn Boyd-Judson, Director
usclevan@dornsife.usc.edu

Maymester: AMST 499- Tourism in the City of Angeles: Past, Present, Future

Maymester 2015 flyer Pulido

Tourism in the City of Angels: Past, Present and Future
Dates:
May 19-June 10, 2015
Section: 10447R
Days/Times: TuWTh, 10:00am-1:00pm
Tuition: $6408 (part of Spring Load)

Click here to view syllabus.

For more information, please contact Professor Pulido at lpulido@usc.edu

ZYGO Series—MEDICINE IN THE MEDIA: Ethical Obligations to Viewers

MEDICINE IN THE MEDIA: Ethical Obligations to Viewers
ZYGO Student Lunchtime Series on Ethics in Medicine
February 20, 2015
| 12:30-2 PM | Doheny Memorial Library, Room 241
Lunch Provided | RSVP: http://bit.ly/1FYG8RG

Medically themed TV shows cover a wide range of genres; they include comedies such as Scrubs, dramas such as Grey’s Anatomy, and soap operas such as General Hospital—the longest-running American soap opera currently in production. Too often the scientific-relevance of treatments presented on such shows is difficult to grasp and inaccurate. Research presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting in 2010 accordingly found that 46 percent of seizure cases depicted on medical dramas were subject to inappropriate treatments.

Along these lines, American news outlets are often criticized for presenting health-related news items in a sensationalist and distorted manner. Panelists for this event will consider the relationship between health issues and their representations in the media. Do TV producers and filmmakers have any ethical obligations to accurately present medical cases? How do current depictions of health on TV and in the news impact the way viewers seek out and view medical treatment?

Moderator: Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director
Panelists:
Doe Mayer, Mary Pickford Professor of Film and Television, USC School of Cinematic Arts, and Professor, USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
Armine Kourouyan, MPH, Project Manager, Hollywood, Health & Society, USC Annenberg Norman Lear Center
Lara Bradshaw, Ph.D. Student, Critical Studies, USC School of Cinematic Arts
William Reckner, Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy, University of California, Los Angeles

Cosponsored by the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

USC LEVAN INSTITUTE FOR HUMANITIES AND ETHICS
The USC Levan Institute engages students with the timeless values at the core of our humanity, promotes moral reflection and understanding of self, facilitates multidisciplinary dialogue, and encourages students to make a positive impact across society and the globe.

University of Southern California
Contact: Dr. Lyn Boyd Judson, Director
usclevan@dornsife.usc.edu

Maymester Spring 2015 – AMST 499: Tourism in the City of Angels: Past, Present, Future

Maymester Summer 2015Maymester: Spring 2015
May 19 – June 10
AMST 499: Tourism in the City: Past, Present, Future

Beaches, Hollywood, Disneyland…these are some of the icons of Los Angeles tourism. Tourism not only represents one of the largest industries in Los Angeles, but it has played a key role in shaping the region. In this Maymester class students will be introduced to Critical Tourism Studies. We will examine how and why global tourism is exploding and look critically at Los Angeles tourism, focusing no its economic and spatial impacts, its implications for racial and economic inequality, its environmental consequences, and alternatives to conventional tourism. We will visit and study major tourist attractions such as Universal Studios, and lesser known ones, including a Toxic Tour.

Instructor: Professor Laura Pulido
Enroll in AMST 499, 10447, for Spring 2015

Class will generally meet Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 10am – 1 pm but there are some all-day field trips and one Saturday fieldtrip.

DEADLINE TO REGISTER: FEBRUARY 24, 2015

For more information, please contact Prof. Pulido at lpullido@usc.edu

Informational Meeting:
Thursday, February 12, 2015
12:30 – 1:30 pm
KAP 460

SPEECH WITHOUT BORDERS: Disentangling Free Speech, Hate Speech, Irreligious Speech, and Seditious Speech

A Levan Coffeehouse Conversation on Practical Ethics
February 11, 2015, Noon | Ground Zero Cafe | Lunch Provided
RSVP:
 http://bit.ly/1DnObIi

The recent massacre at the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Saudi Arabia’s caning of a blogger for religiously offensive speech, and the French government’s crackdown on speech in support of terrorism have intensified debate worldwide over the meaning and limits of public expression.  What sorts of speech should be protected and on what grounds? More

Coffeehouse Conversations Program Director and Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Panelists:
Ed McCann, Professor of Philosophy and English, USC Dornsife
Varun Soni, USC Dean of Religious Life
Marc Cooper, Associate Professor of Professional Practice, USC Annenberg
Arjun Ahuja, Inquisitive Student, Philosophy, Politics and Law, USC Dornsife